Home > Approach > Switching from introduction talk to sales Talk

Switching from introduction talk to sales Talk

Hello my fellow SalesPracticers. I've been a member here for about a month but this is my first reply. I'll take all the advice I can get. Hopefully, some other people have the same problem and will benefit from this as well.

Let's get into it.


When cold calling (driving around and I see a business, I want to make them a client -- so I go in to introduce myself)

What is an effective way to EASE into the Sales Talk after talking about THEM and THEIR business? I'm very good at MAKING STRANGERS LIKE ME right from the start when "Cold calling" so I use that to my advantage. But sometimes, It becomes hard to EASE into the Sales Talk without sounding like the only reason I was nice and friendly is because I wanted the sale? - by Tanson
Hello my fellow SalesPracticers. I've been a member here for about a month but this is my first reply. I'll take all the advice I can get. Hopefully, some other people have the same problem and will benefit from this as well.

Let's get into it.


When cold calling (driving around and I see a business, I want to make them a client -- so I go in to introduce myself)

What is an effective way to EASE into the Sales Talk after talking about THEM and THEIR business? I'm very good at MAKING STRANGERS LIKE ME right from the start when "Cold calling" so I use that to my advantage. But sometimes, It becomes hard to EASE into the Sales Talk without sounding like the only reason I was nice and friendly is because I wanted the sale?
Hi Tanson, welcome!

I suggest "introduction talk" IS "sales talk." And "introduction talk" is also being human, no different than you would react to a family member or friend.

Having said that, what is your definition of "sales talk?". What do you do now? Why do you feel that your "sales talk" sounds like the only reason you were nice to your prospect is because you want the sale?

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
What I am saying is that after introducing myself and finding more out about the prospective client, there is that moment when you, after talking about them and there business, have to say what you do so you can try to schedule an appointment if interested. How do you make that a more natural transition, instead of sounding like the TYPICAL SALESMAN and the only reason for even acting interested in their business is because you wanted the sale?

Does that make better sense? - by Tanson
Eighteen years ago or so I started a business selling what was considered very low priced inter and intra state long distance telephone service. I had never cold called anyone at that time and I had no sales experience and little to zero coaching. So I did what I've always done in life when confronted with something new - I just did it.

I know that's a cliche but it's got truth to it in this way: (besides calling people I knew I wanted to sell to NOT knowing if they wanted this service or not) I began stopping in at small mom and pop non chain grocery stores - not gas stations with sundries also sold inside but small stops where you might pick up a six pack of beer, ice cream bars, candy and chips. And a cup of coffee.

I surmised these small business owners might be looking for a way to save some money. So I'd stop in and if I got lucky and the owner was in I'd go right into a pitch BECAUSE I stopped to do that - NOT make small talk.

I'd introduce myself, stick a business card out, and say I was with a company that could give him/her better phone rates. AND I sold. I signed up customers.

It was crude and I was inexperience BUT what I did was basic selling - get in front of someone and ask if what you offer is what he/she wants or not. That's it!

What you say makes sense, Tanson, if you have doubt about what you should do in a sales call. Once you over come that doubt - that fear - you may be sitting on a gold mine.

MitchM - by MitchM
Hey thanks for the advice, MitchM. And Skip, thanks for trying to help me out. I love this forum, I'll be back to talk to you both again along with others.

Thanks again. - by Tanson
What I am saying is that after introducing myself and finding more out about the prospective client, there is that moment when you, after talking about them and there business, have to say what you do so you can try to schedule an appointment if interested. How do you make that a more natural transition, instead of sounding like the TYPICAL SALESMAN and the only reason for even acting interested in their business is because you wanted the sale?

Does that make better sense?
Yes, I think so. So you're doing cold-calling in person, and your purpose of stopping in is to schedule an appointment.

Your questions to the prospect should be to help determine if there is a fit between your company/product/service and the prospect. If you determine that there is a good fit, then you can ask questions that lead the client to express and interest in your product, but ultimately, you just have to come out and ask for the appointment. I don't know if that's much help, but I feel I don't know enough about your situation to make more specific recommendations. - by Skip Anderson
It becomes hard to EASE into the Sales Talk without sounding like the only reason I was nice and friendly is because I wanted the sale?
I feel that if you have that mentality, it will always be hard for you. You shouldn't think of it that way because you probably have something that will benefit your customers a whole bunch. You're not just wanting the sale, but you're wanting to help them out as well.

What I suggest is adding a value statement in your introduction. "Hi, I'm Faizal with XYZ company. I help business owners cut costs on advertising"....something of that nature that relates to what benefit you can provide them.

And then after your introduction and rapport building, use a transition statement to go into profiling the customers. Say, "We've been helping businesses save a lot of money on advertising lately, and I'm sure we can help you out too. I'd like to learn about how you currently advertise."....from there, go into profiling your customers and learn about their current situation, needs, and future goals.

And then present how you and your product can help them! - by Faizalnisar
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.