Home > Jobs > Business is way down - jump ship or hang tough?

Business is way down - jump ship or hang tough?

In my job I help people buy or sell their manufactured homes which are in parks where you own the home but you rent the lot. Sales have been in the toilet for the last few months and I'm starting to wonder if I should jump ship and find a different sales job or hang tough and stay where I'm at.

My question for the experts is, "How do you know when it's time to abandon ship?" - by Thomas
Thomas, if anyone can understand how you feel, I can. I'm an automotive trainer and for the last 5 months, my business has been terribly down. And usually, when my training is down, product sales are up, and even products have been down, dismally.

I recently sent out 10,000 faxes to dealerships around the country to help develop their internet departments, which is one of my specialities. Under the current market conditions, I even cut my daily rate to help them out. I did not get one response, which has never happened to me before.

After 20 years in the business, I have just decided to give up the training part of my business, and sign on with a mega dealer as their Director of Internet Operations. I had to make this decision, as you called it "jump ship" because I just got tired of the ups and downs of our industry. Fortunately, I'll still keep my products business because they sell really well on the internet.

I'm a big fan of sticking it out. One of the comments I made in another post is, "if you want to be successful, never give up." But I can see when a market is really down, an individual still has to make money and support his family. Decisions like this are made all the time.

I get tired of our government saying that we're not in a recession. People are just not spending money right now. My suggestion to you Thomas is do whatever you have to do, honestly, legally and ethically to prosper, for yourself and your family. What could happen several years from now has nothing to do with decisions you have to make today regarding survival.

I hope people don't take it that I propose quitting every time things get tough. But, a mans got to do what a mans got to do.

Good luck,
Mike - by Mike Whitty
I'd like to take this question a step further, if I may.
What if the manager has "the talk" with you about failing to meet quota for the quarter, and it's obvious that the market is in a downturn? I'm doing my best, but the prospects just aren't willing to invest the money.
(Some background: I sell software in the transportation industry. Have you seen the price of Diesel lately?)
I'm not being fired, but if I'm not meeting quota by the end of May, he has hinted at "discussing actions needed at that time."
Is it time to go? I don't want to, but I don't want to wait until I'm fired, either. - by Mr Paul
I haven't been designated one of fhe so called experts for this thread by my impression is that anyone can add to the dicussion. What to do is a highly subjective question obviously. Your confidence in your current business and in yourself is part of the equation to consider as well as the pros and cons of leaving and what to expect if you do that.

My business is dependent on two things - sales and sponsorship of distributors - and I made the decision to stay with one company regardless of temporary "recessions" into negative or status quo growth. My decision was the result of many considerations.

The main consideration I'd say is do you have an absolute passion or rational connection to what you do and if so do you see today's sales as a temporart situation? Also, could you easily find something else if you applied your time and are you up for it? Do you have the confidence and skills and tenacity to find another sales position in the next 30 - 120 days?

I too can cry about the economy - not everyone wants to use high quality nutrition or will believe that the products I sell can help them in powerful ways and in a sluggish economy not want to spend on what I sell. Nevermind that they'll go to the race track, buys smokes and cokes, and spend money on what they want regardless of what economic strata they're on - so it goes.

At the same time finding people who want to start a network marketing business is a challenge in itself when people have bought into misinformation about the business I'm in - this is also a challenge in any economy.

BUT, having stayed the course I've been successful.

What about you? Can you stay the course and be successful? Can you job hunt while doing what you do? AND what will signal to you that a change has to be made and how will you recognize that signal? That may be the most important question only you - ONLY YOU and not any expert can answer.

The best to you, Thomas.

MitchM - by MitchM
I have to say that I think when you "Jump ship" has to be up to you. You have to be the one to decide that. However you should think about changing you view on the whole thing and instead of worring about selling so much think about having conversations.

Talk with the prospects openly and find out what they are really looking for and decide how you can help...Positive conversations will lead to sales before you know it.

Smiles, - by lrobertson
It's cool all of the different ideas and suggestions. Thank you everyone. thmbp2; - by Thomas
I just recommended this to another SP member on another thread, but I'll recommend it to you, too, Thomas:

Read "The Dip" by Seth Godin. (or get the CD for $5.99 if I recall the price correctly). It's a quick and easy read, and is perfect for you based upon your question.

"The Dip" is that period where things aren't looking so good, and one is trying to decide to keep on keeping on, or make a change.
Successful people have a knack for knowing when to tough it out, and when to bail out. Seth's book sheds valuable light on this topic.

The best to you, Thomas. - by Skip Anderson
I will buy that book Skip. Things are looking real bad and I need to do something about it. :( - by Thomas
Hang in there, my friend. I know it's tough out there for a lot of people. - by Skip Anderson
Thomas,

Hey how long have you been in the manufactured home industry? What area of the world are you located in? When you say buisness is down, is the traffic down as well as the sales, or do you still have decent traffic, just not getting the sales you were getting this time last year? When you do get a prospect what do you find to be your biggest objection?

With a little more insite I may be able to offer you some advice/sugestions thanks,

~James - by Mr. Cesario
Thomas,

Hey how long have you been in the manufactured home industry? What area of the world are you located in? When you say buisness is down, is the traffic down as well as the sales, or do you still have decent traffic, just not getting the sales you were getting this time last year? When you do get a prospect what do you find to be your biggest objection?

With a little more insite I may be able to offer you some advice/sugestions thanks,

~James
I've been in the business a couple of years here in Nevada. Traffic has really slowed down and the sales are just as bad. Objections aren't the problem right now it's the traffic and the sales. It's scary because over half of the competitors closed shop. :un - by Thomas
Thomas,

Only the weak bail out in these times. I understand you've been in this for two years but speak with anyone who knows how to make money and has been in it for decades - they will tell you... it's just a cycle like any other. Every 10 years, the real estate industry goes through something similar and each time the strong come out even more profitable. If the phone doesn't ring, find what does to make it ring! My co. sells real estate advertising and yes, we've had to make adjustments and our sales have been growing and will continue to do so by adapting to the market as needed.

Mike Whitty,

10k out and nothing in return? I don't understand that. My industry has taken a harder hit then the automotive industry and we repeatably get a 2.4-3% return with our direct mail. I have never heard of a zero % return. I realize you're an "expert" on these boards so what have you come up with and what adjustments have you made? - by bluenote
I've been in the business a couple of years here in Nevada. Traffic has really slowed down and the sales are just as bad. Objections aren't the problem right now it's the traffic and the sales. It's scary because over half of the competitors closed shop. :un
Thomas I have to say that I totally agree with blue note in general, but in your case as i see it you have two two problems: (1) a tough real estate market and (2) a product that is becoming obsolete daily.

The first of the two is easy, for every dip, there is always a rise, and it will get better trust me, I sell new homes for a major builder and the hardest hit market has been California, we are getting reports that it's starting to turn around over there, typically it takes 6 months before confidence is regained and life is good again.

Your second problem is a little tougher, Trailers are becoming obsolete, not because there not pratical, because there not cheap, trust me I've sold many of things in my life, and mobile homes is on the list, (I sold Palm Harbors) the problem is when they started to think they could get 100k plus for them it killed them, the site builders steped up their game and as a result they are selling brand new homes on a concrete slabs that start in the 80's. it is my opinion that unless the manufactured housing industry does something drastic you will see fewer and fewer around.

I feel your pain, there is nothing more rewarding than the feeling of helping families into the american dream of home ownership. I would sugest that you stay in the real estate industry because it will get better, but sugest you move over to new home sales, typically I would never say jump ship, and I am not telling you to do so just simply sugesting that you consider another side of it.

Either way I wish you the best but homes are still being sold everyday, I sell 1-2 a week here in Texas and I can't wait until it gets better bgwnk;

~James - by Mr. Cesario
Your second problem is a little tougher, Trailers are becoming obsolete, not because there not pratical, because there not cheap, trust me I've sold many of things in my life, and mobile homes is on the list, (I sold Palm Harbors) the problem is when they started to think they could get 100k plus for them it killed them, the site builders steped up their game and as a result they are selling brand new homes on a concrete slabs that start in the 80's. it is my opinion that unless the manufactured housing industry does something drastic you will see fewer and fewer around.

I feel your pain, there is nothing more rewarding than the feeling of helping families into the american dream of home ownership. I would sugest that you stay in the real estate industry because it will get better, but sugest you move over to new home sales, typically I would never say jump ship, and I am not telling you to do so just simply sugesting that you consider another side of it.

Either way I wish you the best but homes are still being sold everyday, I sell 1-2 a week here in Texas and I can't wait until it gets better bgwnk;

~James
Thank you James. I think the MHs are going the way of the Dodo too. That's part of what scares me. I'm going to be getting a real estate license soon because I know I can't count on the MHs in the future. The second part that scares me is starting out in real estate right now with the market in turmoil. Real estate will be my future but I just need to make some money now! - by Thomas
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