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Setting Appointments

I have been an award winning life insurance agent working from a field rep. to the upper echelons of management, to a highly successful recruiter and corporate trainer all for the same company in under five years.

When setting appts. always offer two winning choices.

After clearly and enthusiastically defining the benefits of meeting with you setting the appt. should be easy.

It's like closing the sale, after you 'sell' them on the idea of meeting with you the logical next step is to meet.

For example,

"Mr./Mrs. Jones I'm going to be out in your area this week, which is better for you afternoons or evenings?"

Then offer two winning choices again,

"Afternoons? Super! Would you prefer early in the week or are weekends better for you?"

"Early in the week? alright, I have a couple of openings left on monday and tuesday, what works best for you?"

"Tuesday? How about 1:15 PM? Or is 4:40 better?"

If you use odd times like the above even if you have no appts. lined up at all you're giving the impression that you're a busy guy trying to fit them in to your busy schedule, and they better grab an appt. now before everyone else has the opportunity to benefit from your product/service before them.

WHY OFFER TWO WINNING CHOICES AND WHO'S WINNING WHAT?

I'm glad you asked, offering a straight yes or no question becomes too easy for them to say no.

If you offer two choices that both work to your advantage then you're winning the appt. and the potential client is winning the opportunity to share some of your valuable time and also benefit from your products/services.

You DO believe in yourself and you're product/service right? You have to if you want to succeed.

Don't get discouraged after getting a bunch of 'No, I'm not interested' get excited!

Move on to the next prospect, happily!

Setting appts. is, like sales, a simple numbers game. The only way to win the game is to play the game. Stay on the phone until you meet your daily goal of x-number of appts.

When I was a highly successful life insurance agent working on commission only(Takes a lot of testicular fortitude to work on commission only)I used to duck-tape my phone to my head until I had the required number of appts set.

My kids thought I was a psycho walking around my home office with a phone taped to my head! Oh well........it worked! - by Ronster
(Takes a lot of testicular fortitude to work on commission only)I used to duck-tape my phone to my head until I had the required number of appts set.
Actually we have some women here that have fortitude.

After that I was wondering what you were going to duck-tape. Actually breathed a sigh of relief when you said "phone".

So, anyway, I take it you believe very much in the "alternate advance" aka "choice of double positive".

From your own experience, what have you got against offering a prospect the opportunity to say no? - by Gary Boye
Actually we have some women here that have fortitude.

After that I was wondering what you were going to duck-tape. Actually breathed a sigh of relief when you said "phone".

So, anyway, I take it you believe very much in the "alternate advance" aka "choice of double positive".

From your own experience, what have you got against offering a prospect the opportunity to say no?
From my own experience, I don't engage people in forums who make negative comments to new forum members the way you just did.

My post was meant to help people who may be new to sales or struggling.

If you'd like to offer more positive comments i'd be happy to respond.

have a super-fantastic day gary. - by Ronster
My post was meant to help people who may be new to sales or struggling.
I'm sure that's right and I am sorry to offend you. The word picture of the duct tape in your post was unusual, and I found it funny--which I'm sure you meant it to be. I simply responded in kind. Then I looked for some elaboration on why you avoided "no" responses. Others here might ask you the same question.

You're new here-and I want you to know that the "yes-no" questioning topic frequently arises on this forum. Many, including myself, enjoy a variety of viewpoints on that topic. I just thought, that as an award-winning rep, highly successful recruiter, and corporate trainer, you might want to share the philosophy behind your thoughts with those of us who struggle--and also those of us who don't.

I promise I will respect your wishes to not engage in conversation with me, and I am looking forward to reading your contributions. - by Gary Boye
I'd like to apologize Gary,

I probably took what you said the wrong way. I'm sincere about this.

I just left another forum because of negativity problems and my guard is still up.

Let's just forget it happened and start again, ok?

I usually include both masculine/feminine when posting in forums so not to offend the stronger sex (women.)

I have nothing against offering the prospect the opportunity to say no, I just like to be in front of them so that I can have the opportunity to properly address their concerns to see if they are valid or not. (sometimes people find it easier to say no over the phone knowing nothing about the products I represent.)

So, when setting appointments I try not to offer any opportunity to say no. In my mind only 10% of people have adequate insurance coverage.

When face to face in a sales interview situation if the prospect has a real and valid objection that I can't overcome or if I feel that this person has no need for my product.........I walk happily out the door thanking him/her for their time and feeling good about myself knowing that I tried to help this person.

As soon as I get down the road a little ways I pull over and record the objection that I couldn't overcome and brainstorm ways to overcome it in the future.

By writing it down I'm making my subconscience aware of my inadequacy and making a conscience decision to improve on it.

Best Regards Gary,

Ronster - by Ronster
I have nothing against offering the prospect the opportunity to say no, I just like to be in front of them so that I can have the opportunity to properly address their concerns to see if they are valid or not. (sometimes people find it easier to say no over the phone knowing nothing about the products I represent.)
This happens in person too. I'll give you an example. The last few weeks my wife and I have been talking about joining this new excercise gym in town. She sold it so well I am looking forward to starting.

So far so good right? Ok, so then a few days ago these kids show up at my door trying to sell me something and of course I kick 'em off the porch. :D

After I close the door my wife says, "Who was it?" and what do I say? "Nobody honey, just some kids selling discounted gym memberships". And then it hits me. That's the gym we want to join. Ah Crap! :eek:

I can still see my wife with her arms crossed, foot tapping, and that oh too familiar "you dumb a**" look on her face. :D

Anyway, I was so distracted by my own defenses that by the time I processed what those kids were saying it was too late. I think this happens all the time in sales both on the phone and in-person. - by Agent Smith
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