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Most Important Part of the Sales Process

The Discovery is the most important part of the sales process for it is in the Discovery that the client will give you a roadmap that will lead you to the sale. The 4 purposes of the Discovery are as follows:
  1. Find the Dominant Buying Motive: What 3rd level emotional need will be met by buying your product
  2. Find the Problem: Why is your product of more value than the price you are asking? What problem are you meeting that they currently have?
  3. Find Future Objections: A good Discovery will allow you to find out about the objections that will be brought out later. This gives you time to answer the objections before they are even raised later.
  4. Self Discovery for the Prospect: Many times our prospects really do not know what they need and it is in the discovery that they will reveal to both you and themselves why their needs
Every Discovery should accomplish these 4 things and once the Discovery is mastered the closing rate will dramatically rise. Most of the time when I work with sales people that are struggling one of the first things I look at is the Discovery because if an adequate Discovery is not conducted the sales person does not know how to present his or her product. As the Discovery helps us understand how to sell because we cannot sell into we know what they prospect needs and will buy... - by Joeylean
This is really good. Thank you for sharing. thmbp2; - by Thomas
THAT is excellent advice. Great post.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
Do you have any favorite questions for "self-discovery"? - by Liberty
Good post. These are really important part of sales process. Thanks for information. - by Team Building FL
Great post.

I was always taught the 'Doctor Analogy'

The doctor probably has a good idea what would be the right 'product/solution' for you but....he'd be a fool to take the chance and get it wrong.

Now, because he has likely seen similar circumstances to yours, the saleperson (sorry doctor....deliberate irony here) knows what questions to ask in order to eliminate all the wrong possibilities in his/her diagnosis.

This translates....

.....a good 'discovery'/'qualification' is like saying to the customer (patient) lets have a discussion here so that you can create the perfect solution for yourself....so that when I present that solution later, you'll really want it (of course you will.....YOU created it)

It also translates.....

Let's cover loads of questions and we'll find out what you really want....then afterwards I'll ask you....if I can give you what you want.....do you want it?

There is only ever ONE answer to THAT hypothetical question! - by helisell
  1. Find Future Objections: A good Discovery will allow you to find out about the objections that will be brought out later. This gives you time to answer the objections before they are even raised later.
I agree with everything you've said David and I'd like some more clarity on this above quote.

From my understanding of an objection, it is an objection is an expressed or unexpressed concern which does not follow with your sales process.

To uncover objections throughout the Discovery process doesn't compute with me. Other then initial resistance, most objections come out during a 'Recommend' phase where you link the customers interests/needs to the benefits of your product.

Prior to Recommend, you really are building a relationship with your prospect and asking questions to uncover what is important to them.

Yes? - by MrCharisma
The Discovery is the most important part of the sales process...
David I like to think that once you've gain favorable entry into the prospect's world then Discovery becomes the next most important part of the sales process.
... for it is in the Discovery that the client will give you a roadmap that will lead you to the sale. The 4 purposes of the Discovery are as follows:
David I would add a fifth purpose which many label as Need Development.
Find Future Objections: A good Discovery will allow you to find out about the objections that will be brought out later. This gives you time to answer the objections before they are even raised later.
You have 'finding future objections' in your list. I know from experience that the term 'objection' has been used as a catch-all for everything ranging from a stall to flat out rejection so further clarification would be appreciated. I will say that it is very possible to uncover 'attitudes' or 'prejudices' that may lead to objections during the Discovery phase. - by SalesProfessor
The 4 purposes of the Discovery are as follows:
  1. Find the Dominant Buying Motive: What 3rd level emotional need will be met by buying your product
  2. Find the Problem: Why is your product of more value than the price you are asking? What problem are you meeting that they currently have?
  3. Find Future Objections: A good Discovery will allow you to find out about the objections that will be brought out later. This gives you time to answer the objections before they are even raised later.
  4. Self Discovery for the Prospect: Many times our prospects really do not know what they need and it is in the discovery that they will reveal to both you and themselves why their needs
This is an excellent thread. I very much like David's outline of the Discovery Process.

I have mixed feelings as to labeling the Discovery as the most important part of the sales process. But I'll leave that aside and offer some advice to newcomers and novices. Zero in to those four points David gave us. The man MUST HAVE spent considerable time and effort on this, and his contribution with that post is extraordinary. FOUR points--stay with them. They need not be abridged, amended, or added to. There is a WEALTH of knowledge there for the taking. - by Gary A Boye
Great post. Proper discovery lets you design an effective sales presentation. - by Faizalnisar
The discovery process, must uncover 'who' needs to be in the discussion. Presenting solutions to people who can only say 'I have to talk with ____________' stalls the sales process and often times simply halts it. Sales people need to be talking with the decision makers who have are willing and able to make a decision. - by Paulette Halpern
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