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Words That Sell!

Let's put together a master list of the most effective words that sell. You first. ;st - by Frankie
I don't have any magic words that well, Frankie. The magic is in the other person saying: I want that.

I don't use sizzle words or enticing adjectives and pictures. I make a straight offer - so for me a straight offer sells to someone who wants what I offer.

I sell nutritional products of various kinds and a business opportunity to be a rep with our company. Over the past twelve years I've scripted myself in more ways than I can remember learning from some of the best in the sales/network marketing industry. One of my favorite is "High Probability Selling" BUT there are others I've learned from to sell.

I speak with confidence and conviction, I have thorough knowledge of my company, products and business plan, and I am a very good listener and question asker. Nevertheless, I have no magic words yet by working very casually yet consistently over the years - I'm a lazy worker with a slack work ethic BUT I like my lifestyle a lot - I've built an international business world wide.

Okay. Maybe someone will enlighten us with his or her words to sell. For me the magic is in the conversation.

The best of the best to you.

MitchM - by MitchM
Mitch, this thread is about copywriting.

All of us who participate here at SalesPractice know you're head over heals gaga about your favorite book, but even you have to admit that the book you love to promote at every opportunity doesn't have anything to do with copywriting. - by Skip Anderson
Hey Skip I read the heading too quickly AND from the question didn't distinguish written from spoken - that's my failure to maybe misunderstand the question and definitely miss the heading of this section.

BUT that doesn't make me gaga nor does it cause me to gag over these things, Skip. Instead taking your shot at me ad value to the post by adding an expert opinion.

OKAY, a word that sells is FREE.

MitchM - by MitchM
You guys seem to have a fued going on here ;bg but a word that sells is VALUE. - by MoneyMaker
Skip has a fued going on with himself, MoneyMaker. He takes shots at me out of context many times without adding value to the thread and on occasion I reply - in my last reply I admitted my error but not Skip has not added valut to the question at hand. Why I don't know as he is an expert here and I respect his experience and what he can offer us for discussion.

When I see VALUE or my word FREE in copy I read it usually if it's something I'm thinking at the time - like most people I look for what's the catch. I got a free phone from sprint today I've yet to look at carefully and call the 800# but I will - FREE got my attention.

The best to you.

MitchM - by MitchM
Skip has a fued going on with himself, MoneyMaker. MitchM
I'm not having a feud with myself. I'm having a feud with you.

He takes shots at me out of context many times without adding value to the thread and on occasion I reply
What's out of context about me challenging what you posted?

Here's my opinion: I think you're overpromoting your favorite book in this forum, Mitch, and I think me pointing that out adds value to the thread. As you have admitted, the book you recommended in this thread has nothing to do with the topic of this thread.

in my last reply I admitted my error but Skip has not added value to the question at hand.
MitchM
I don't feel I'm an expert in the area of copywriting, so I choose not to "add value" to the thread other than pointing out that you're overpromoting a book you like. Some of us in this community choose not to participate in threads where we don't have expertise. Perhaps you could learn from that,Mitch? - by Skip Anderson
"Some of us in this community choose not to participate in threads where we don't have expertise. Perhaps you could learn from that,Mitch?" -- Skip

That's nothing to feud about. I appreciate amateur opionins and sometimes the expert and amateur opinon add value to a conversation.

For twelve years I taught journalism and produced a high school yearbook - my degrees are in English and literature - though amateur, I have experience editing and copy writing.

FREE and VALUE are attention grabbing words. They can also be attention numbing words - overkill!

MitchM - by MitchM
Safe
Secure
Free
When
My
Me
I
We
Today
Later
Discount - by Mr. Mike
"Value", discussed above by a few, is not a strong copywriting word. "FREE" is.

"Announcing" is strong. The personal pronouns mentioned above can be effective. "NOW" is effective. "Limited", "Finally", "Secret" are all good words. "How to.." can be powerful.

Those are a handfull. - by Ace Coldiron
Grand Opening! Super Blitz! Everything Must Go! Half Price! Two for One! Spectacular! Big Sale! Really Big Sale! We'll Beat Any Price! Going Out of Business Sale! No Money Down! Ninety Days Same as Cash! Bargains Galore! One Day Only Sale! Midnight Madness! Buy Today! Last Chance to Save! - by MPrince
Just don't overuse these, it makes you copy sound canned and not sincere. - by alexhar
How can "Grand Opening" sound canned if that is what you are having? How can "Going Out of Business" sound canned if you are going out of business? How can "Everything Must Go" sound canned if you are liquidating? How can "Last Chance to Save" sound canned if the sale is over today? You use them when they are appropriate. Of course it would sound canned if I ran a "Going Out of Business Sale" once a month. You don't have to write copy or be in advertising to know that.

MP - by MPrince
I am going to give a word. The word really does not sell.\

That word is

ME - by rich34232
The word really does not sell. That word is ME
Amen to that! Always remember that what you're selling matters to the person you're targeting, not you.

I work in the training field around auto retail people, and let me tell you, they take ME to the extreme! A lot of it is sheer, raw ego, like "I'm going to tell you what to buy, and you're going to like me because I am me and I know what I know and I know better..."

It's a little affliction called "experience".

Best approach to copywriting is striking the tone of giving to the customer. Anything that adds value, perceived or not, or adds an emotional response, or adds a sense of urgency or rapport; now that will draw your people in.

"End of month sale - Last chance to take advantage of big discounts on your favorite ABC Brand vehicles.

Imagine the rumble of your favorite country road as you speed along on your way to a weekend fishing trip with your kids, or a picnic away from the hustle of the city with your special someone. The trip can only be better when you're behind the wheel of the high-performance ABC Econobox, now available for immediate delivery at XYZ Motors.

So far this month, our sales event has been successful - we've been practically giving away hundreds of thousands of dollars in discounts on 2009 vehicles. Why aren't you taking advantage of a great deal, like so many friends and neighbors in Whoville over the past three weeks?

Not only are we selling the ABC Econobox for $5,000 below sticker price, but we're throwing in our Gold service plan at no cost to you! The service plan alone is worth another $595.00!"

Now, I don't claim to be an expert either, but I've collaborated with quite a few expert marketers in the auto space to know how to apply their formula.

Much luck to all,

Kurt W Hoppe II - by kurtwhoppe
When calling and introducing yourself never use,
"This is ____ CALLING from/on behalf (whatever)"

I teach my reps to use SPEAKING instead of CALLING.
Speaking demands respect and attention, calling on the other hand sends out warning signs that many people interpret as telemarketer. - by tele_trainer
When calling, our script doesn't use the phrase, this is Tom calling either, nor do we use speaking, unless someone calls in and asks for us and we've answered the phone... then "Is Tom in?" is responded to by saying "Speaking!"

When we call, it is Good Morning John, this is TL with AFLAC,Assurity, TransAmerica and the reason for (my/this) call is to schedule an appointment with YOU in order to get YOUR opinion on...

My question would be, what is wrong or threatening or weak about using the words calling?

Aloha... Tom shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Considering often times our contacts will receive multiple calls before they actually pick up, we've found it to be better for B2B and so-so for B2C. B2B is also dialed without a lead on file. - by tele_trainer
The actual words become less important once you learn the underlying concept of what the owrds need to convey. This is waht I have learned 1. You must be presenting a Big Benefit. 2. You have to be able to make a valid promise. 3. You have to go into great detail about exactly what you are offering. 4. You need testimonials. 5. You have to paint a good picture of what the result will be for them. 6. You need to re-phrase and summarise all of the above to them. 7. Finally you have to have a call to action ( a close/closing question) Once you understand this sequence you'll find that the actual (words that sell) words you use assume less importance. Good luck - by helisell
The actual words become less important once you learn the underlying concept of what the owrds need to convey. This is waht I have learned 1. You must be presenting a Big Benefit. 2. You have to be able to make a valid promise. 3. You have to go into great detail about exactly what you are offering. 4. You need testimonials. 5. You have to paint a good picture of what the result will be for them. 6. You need to re-phrase and summarise all of the above to them. 7. Finally you have to have a call to action ( a close/closing question) Once you understand this sequence you'll find that the actual (words that sell) words you use assume less importance. Good luck
Those are seven very valid and instructive points. Although your post strays a bit from the actual topic, your advice is very valuable. - by Ace Coldiron
Hi Ace Coldiron....the topic WAS 'words that sell'.

In my experience there is an assumption that 'the actual words' are an important issue. I was trying to get over the point that 'the concept' is far more important that the 'selling words'.

Usually when people ask about 'the words' they mean the 'magic' words . . . . y'know...the ones that will remove all the skill and understanding and will magically turn my prospect into a customer. - by helisell
Hi Ace Coldiron....the topic WAS 'words that sell'.

In my experience there is an assumption that 'the actual words' are an important issue. I was trying to get over the point that 'the concept' is far more important that the 'selling words'.

Usually when people ask about 'the words' they mean the 'magic' words . . . . y'know...the ones that will remove all the skill and understanding and will magically turn my prospect into a customer.
I DO know that.

Coincidentally it also applies to your post that I responded to. If we fetter on the "words" of the topic and only those words, we lose out on something such as you contributed which does reflect the skill and understanding that you refer to.

However, "words that sell" is usually a phrase that refers to the tools of copywriters, presentation designers, and those salespeople that are continuing to attempt to refine their language for presenting. - by Ace Coldiron
Ooopppsss sorry..

The capitalisation was a mistake. - by helisell
Ooopppsss sorry..

The capitalisation was a mistake.
Mine was INTENTIONAL.

It's OK here, helisell. Some people do bold fonts to stress a point. Some use bullets. - by Ace Coldiron
To get attention I use:
New
Win
Free

To sell I use action words such as:
Call
Visit
Purchase
Fax
Email
Click (here)
Limited Time/quantity


To impress upon (Impact) i use:
Safe
Proven
Easy


To hook people I use words that hit their hot buttons:
Save money
Save time
Discount
Rebate

To create good will I will use words like:
You are right
Excellent
Absolutely
No problem
Right away
That is a good question
That is interesting
Tell me more
Their name - by Andrea
In my experience there is an assumption that 'the actual words' are an important issue. I was trying to get over the point that 'the concept' is far more important that the 'selling words'.

Usually when people ask about 'the words' they mean the 'magic' words . . . . y'know...the ones that will remove all the skill and understanding and will magically turn my prospect into a customer.
I agree that nothing or not one thing will "magically" turn the prospect into a customer. But the "actual words" are of huge importance. Words are what a sales person uses to convey the message.
Use too many words you bore the customer (they'll start thinking about their to do list or what they have to buy at the grocery store).
Use the wrong words you confuse the customer (then they start thinking about picking up their kids at soccer practice).
Use too little words you risk not conveying the value (they will not be interested)

A good sales person takes time to craft the message to get the desired response from the customer at the right time. Words grab attention, create trust, explain what your product or service is, close the sale. With the right sequence of words you can get a customer to buy and feel good about their purchase decision so that they become return customers and they recommend you to their friends. - by Andrea
Speaking demands respect and attention, calling on the other hand sends out warning signs that many people interpret as telemarketer.
Maybe. I take a different approach... "I just say This is (name) from xyz company" IMO calling and speaking are superfluous words that don't add any value to the message. They know I'm speaking since they can hear me and they know I'm calling since they picked up the phone.

I am a fan of being direct and to the point because it shows that I care about their time. Also insert too many useless words in your intro and you've already lost them. - by Andrea
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