Home > Social Influence > Does Lingo and Buzzwords Help?

Does Lingo and Buzzwords Help?

Some people think that using the same Lingo and Buzzwords as your client increases the chances of the client saying "yes" to you. I tend to agree.

What do you think? - by AZBroker
Some people think that using the same Lingo and Buzzwords as your client increases the chances of the client saying "yes" to you. I tend to agree.

What do you think?
Otherwise known as "speaking the client's language", this absolutely works--as long as it is done with integrity. If you throw around lingo without knowing what it means, forget it. If you take the time to learn, however, it's just another way you've reached into your client's situation to understand them and their needs better.

Peace,
Terri Z - by Terri Zwierzynski
Thanks for the input Terri. :) - by AZBroker
Well put Terri! ;) - by SalesGuy
Otherwise known as "speaking the client's language", this absolutely works--as long as it is done with integrity. If you throw around lingo without knowing what it means, forget it. If you take the time to learn, however, it's just another way you've reached into your client's situation to understand them and their needs better.
Terri, I agree with you. But I would love to hear a real life example where using the same "lingo" or "buzzwords" as a client uses is effective. I'm not sure that the activity is necessarily the same as "speaking the clients' language".

If a person is a buyer of industrial valves, and I sell for a distributor of industrial valves, chances are the terms we use are going to be the same. We both speak the language of the trade. So I don't think that is any act of volition on the part of me--the seller.

Let's suppose, however that I am a life insurance salesman talking to the ownership of the family valve business about key man insurance or the funding of a buy/sell agreement. Who's buzzwords and lingo would I be using then--and how would that gain me an advantage? If I start talking about valves with these guys, it's not much different than petting the goldfish. It can look like transparent patronization to people who would just as soon get down to business and discuss the issues. - by Gary Boye
Let's suppose, however that I am a life insurance salesman talking to the ownership of the family valve business about key man insurance or the funding of a buy/sell agreement. Who's buzzwords and lingo would I be using then--and how would that gain me an advantage? If I start talking about valves with these guys, it's not much different than petting the goldfish. It can look like transparent patronization to people who would just as soon get down to business and discuss the issues.
Good point, Gary. I think the nuance here is that any buzzwords/lingo you use need to authentically relate to the business relationship/transaction at hand.

For instance in your example above, your valve guy may not know what "key man insurance" means. If he uses different terminology to refer to the same concept as key man insurance, you'd probably be better off using his "slang" rather than forcing the unfamiliar term on him.

That's not exactly the same as buzzwords/lingo -- but I think it comes down to the same principal, speaking the language of your customer as part of building the relationship. - by Terri Zwierzynski
Good point, Gary. I think the nuance here is that any buzzwords/lingo you use need to authentically relate to the business relationship/transaction at hand.

For instance in your example above, your valve guy may not know what "key man insurance" means. If he uses different terminology to refer to the same concept as key man insurance, you'd probably be better off using his "slang" rather than forcing the unfamiliar term on him.

That's not exactly the same as buzzwords/lingo -- but I think it comes down to the same principal, speaking the language of your customer as part of building the relationship.
Terri, what I'm getting at is this: The driving force for how the seller speaks must be to deliver his/her message in language the prospect can understand. That may or may not be the customer's own language. In the case of the insurance situation, terms and concepts would probably be introduced that the prospects hadn't heard before. Words should be chosen for the purpose of clarity--not necessarily for rapport. If we make things easy for the prospect to understand, it helps create an experience that will result in sales and referrals.

In selling, we really click when we are able to capture and further clarify the prospect's thoughts--not necessarily his words. People who have the ability to do that command a much greater presence that people who lack that ability. That is one more reason why creative and attentive listening is a critical skill in selling. - by Gary Boye
...using the same Lingo and Buzzwords as your client increases the chances of the client saying "yes" to you.
In my experience with people from all walks of life this statement rings true. - by Liberty
Terri, what I'm getting at is this: The driving force for how the seller speaks must be to deliver his/her message in language the prospect can understand. That may or may not be the customer's own language.
Ahhh. I get your point now Gary -- that's a discernment I hadn't realized before.

I'm learning a lot from you Gary! :) - by Terri Zwierzynski
Ahhh. I get your point now Gary -- that's a discernment I hadn't realized before.
Terri, I missed it, what was the discernment? - by bridger480
Terri, I missed it, what was the discernment?
I'm not sure I can explain it any better than Gary did above, but I'll try :)

There is a difference between emulating the client's language (buzzwords and lingo, for example), and communicating your message clearly. The latter is more a skill of listening and responding appropriately in language the client can grasp.

Buzzwords and lingo may be helpful in certain situations where they are a kind of shorthand for certain concepts, but they aren't a panacea. The more important skill is listening. If along the way a certain lingo is helpful, great. But it doesn't seem like something you necessarily need to focus on! - by Terri Zwierzynski
I'm not sure I can explain it any better than Gary did above, but I'll try :)
You just did explain it better, Terri. - by Gary Boye
Beatiful, Georgeous, Lovely, A real eye turner.

Unsurpassed excellence, First class, First rate.

Off the hook, Off the chain, Sweeeet, The bomb.

Security, Investment, Stability, Excellent growth potential.

Invigorating, Exciting, Stimulating.

If this is what you mean by buzz words or phrases then my answer is a resounding, YES! We use adjectives every day. We'd be very boring without them. - by klozerking
On the opposite side of the coin, it is important that you understand the language of your industry. Remember, jargon can be used as a "qualifier" and those who are in know it while those who are out don't. ;) - by SalesGuy
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.