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Take away closing technique

Here's another close I found online, the "Take Away Close". It was explained as, "Forcing a customer is to make a decision, by "taking it away" often closes a sale."

Does anyone use this with success? - by bridger480
Here's another close I found online, the "Take Away Close". It was explained as, "Forcing a customer is to make a decision, by "taking it away" often closes a sale."

Does anyone use this with success?
The "take away close" is manipulative and often (not always) dishonest. The idea behind it is to imply to an interested prospect, who is not completely committed, that the product might now be suddenly unavailable--or unavailable at the price and/or terms discussed. It is supposed to create an urgency for the customer to buy, once it is discovered that the product/price/terms are available--i.e. "but you need to decide now."

In many cases the information about lack of, or limited availability, is a lie. - by Gary Boye
Here is a quote from Kevin Hogan:

In a nutshell, you give the customer one opportunity to purchase your product or hire you. If they donít, you make it explicitly clear that you will move on and allow others to take advantage of your services.

This is the basic pattern:
ďIt makes no difference to me whether you buy this X or not. You have until tomorrow to make a decision and reserve your X or not. If I donít hear from you by noon, Iíll know you didnít want it. No pressure. Bye.Ē

If there is any manipulation or dishonesty involved it is with the salesperson and not the technique/tool. ;) - by SalesGuy
Here is a quote from Kevin Hogan:


[/indent]If there is any manipulation or dishonesty involved it is with the salesperson and not the technique/tool. ;)
His example is one of manipulation in the form of a powerless ultimatum. If any salesperson ever said that to me, I'd show him the door immediately. If anybody that ever worked for me ever issued that ultimatum to a prospect, I would instruct him never to do that again--or he could hand me his resignation. - by Gary Boye
For most salesmen, once they get the committment from the customer to purchase their product, their sale is closed. In my profession, I use the "take away" close quite differently. On average, after a customer has given me their committment to purchase the vehicle that fits their needs/wants the best, I hear "No" 4 more times before my sale is closed.

Example: Customer agrees that if our numbers match up they will purchase our car. Now, I must make the customer satisfied with the selling price of the vehicle, the monthly payments associated with said car and the term of the loan. Chances are that the customer has picked out a car that costs more than they want to pay with features that appeal to their wants instead of their needs. During negotiations, if we reach a point in which the dealership can not (or will not) sell the vehicle they want at the price they request I will first try to "take away" a feature that they told me that they NEED during the qualifying stage. For most people, they will justify the extra cost of this vehicle because it has something that will make their life too unpleasant to live without. Sale closed.

Some customers will still insist that I will not get a sale on a car that doesn't have X feature. At that point I give them that feature back but once again take away another one. This time taking something they want (such as a moonroof or a spoiler). More people are likely to give up something like this because they know they can always get this added on at a later time. Sale closed.

Also, I would like to mention that once a "want" feature is taken away, my avg. commission is higher as we switch cars and the negotiation process starts all over in the dealership's mind. I think that the customer feels like "we have been negotiating price for x mins/x hours, so we must be getting the best deal." I think most people don't like negotiating price, they do it because they don't want to feel stupid in front of their friends/family when someone asks, "How much did you pay for that?" and then the friend tells them that he bought it for X. - by EXP Creative
The "take away close" is manipulative and often (not always) dishonest. The idea behind it is to imply to an interested prospect, who is not completely committed, that the product might now be suddenly unavailable--or unavailable at the price and/or terms discussed. It is supposed to create an urgency for the customer to buy, once it is discovered that the product/price/terms are available--i.e. "but you need to decide now."

In many cases the information about lack of, or limited availability, is a lie.
This close was presented differently (and more innocently) to me.

I was under the impression it was used after hearing "no" and as you pack up your briefcase. ie: such as..."OK, well you won't be needing this such and such..."

Offering the benefits out on the table during the presentation and then taking them back as you leave.

I've never actually tried it (because I can't make it sound natural).

Regarding Gary's interpretation, I am in agreement with him. I love the scene on the Simpson's where Homer is watching a commercial on TV and shouts "LIMITED??" and grabs the phone and starts frantically dialing to order his subliminal weight loss tapes. - by RainMaker
His example is one of manipulation in the form of a powerless ultimatum.
You are entitled to believe anything your heart desires. ;) - by SalesGuy
In my profession, I use the "take away" close quite differently.
Zoom, that's a very informative post. Your example shows a solid understanding of the sales process as it applies to your own profession. I'm sure that the more you have used your skills, the easier it has been to see both similarities and differences from one case to another. - by Gary Boye
I'm sure that the more you have used your skills, the easier it has been to see both similarities and differences from one case to another.
That is what's keeps me in sales day in and day out. It doesn't matter how many people you talk to, you will never make the same exact sale twice! The main thing I was trying to show everyone will my drawn out example is that the take away close isn't just a last ditch effort to push a client into the purchase, but if you can find a way to relate it to your own profession you can often use it more than once on the same client with success. - by EXP Creative
That is what's keeps me in sales day in and day out. It doesn't matter how many people you talk to, you will never make the same exact sale twice! The main thing I was trying to show everyone will my drawn out example is that the take away close isn't just a last ditch effort to push a client into the purchase, but if you can find a way to relate it to your own profession you can often use it more than once on the same client with success.
I agree with Gary Zoom that your post is very informative. I've never sold the way you do - my background isn't in sales - but I'vebeen sold to the way you just described and now I understand it.

Finding a way to relate the "take Away" to our lives is excellent advice.

Thanks! - by MitchM
I agree with Gary Zoom that your post is very informative. I've never sold the way you do - my background isn't in sales - but I've bought the way you just described.

Finding a way to relate the "take Away" to our lives is excellent advice.

Thanks!
Thank you Mitch. I can see you using the take away on the salesman on your next car purchase :eek: <--car salesman's face. I would pay to see that! - by EXP Creative
I hadn't thought of the "take-away" in that light but the concept sounds good. Thank you for your response. - by bridger480
If there is any manipulation or dishonesty involved it is with the salesperson and not the technique/tool.
What's wrong with manipulation? - by Franklin
What's wrong with manipulation?
There is nothing inherently "wrong" with "manipulation". - by SalesGuy
There is nothing inherently "wrong" with "manipulation".
So why does it matter if a close is manipulative? - by Franklin
So why does it matter if a close is manipulative?
I think what "matters" is your beliefs about manipulation. ;) - by SalesGuy
There is nothing inherently "wrong" with "manipulation".
Nothing, I suppose, if you see your customers as sheep to be sheared and don't plan on doing business with them more than once.

I deal with the same customers week after week and sooner or later they would figure out if I was manipulating them and I'd be out of business a week later.

Pat - by toolguy_35
Nothing, I suppose, if you see your customers as sheep to be sheared and don't plan on doing business with them more than once.

I deal with the same customers week after week and sooner or later they would figure out if I was manipulating them and I'd be out of business a week later.

Pat
Skilled manipulators can work with the same people day after day and week after week. Have you ever seen a child manipulate a parent? ;wi - by SalesGuy
Skilled manipulators can work with the same people day after day and week after week. Have you ever seen a child manipulate a parent? ;wi
I have four children, and it makes me angry whey they try to manipulate me. How much more so is a customer when he finds he's been diddled by a salesman.

That kind of attitude is what has given salespeople a bad name.

IMHO sales requires the highest personal integrity and ethics simply because it is enteirly too easy to cheat. Once you start down that particular path it's way to easy to go again.

Many of my customers deal exclusively with me because they have been manipulated into a sale or otherwise cheated by other tool dealers in the past.

Dealing with your customers fairly and honestly will serve you in good stead building clientele.

Pat - by toolguy_35
That kind of attitude is what has given salespeople a bad name.
Which attitude is that?

Dealing with your customers fairly and honestly will serve you in good stead building clientele.
I don't disagree. - by SalesGuy
Which attitude is that?
That manipulation is not a bad thing, our job is not to manipulate, it is to help a customer find a solution to a problem that meets their needs.

Before you were in sales, how often were you the victim or near victim of a manipulative, high pressure salesman who left you with a bad taste in your mouth a day or a week later?

Even as a sales professional I dislike that kind of dealing. The more so because it makes my job harder. (And believe me, making a go of the tool business is hard enough.)

Pat - by toolguy_35
That manipulation is not a bad thing, our job is not to manipulate, it is to help a customer find a solution to a problem that meets their needs.
As I mentioned earlier, IMO there is nothing inherently "wrong" with "manipulation". I'd go on to say that there is no "right" or "wrong" but thinking makes it so. This is why, IMO, what "matters" is your beliefs about manipulation.

If a person's experiences (referent) with manipulation have been negative, like those in your posts, it's not hard to see how he/she could form a less than favorable attitude towards the topic.

Let me provide an example where "manipulation" doesn't run contrary to "dealing with your customers fairly and honestly" or "the highest personal integrity and ethics".

Let's say that we're talking about a real estate agent who specializes in the listing and marketing of residential homes. A homeowner in the agent's area who wants to sell his home sees the agent's sign in a neighbor's yard and calls to inquire about the agent's services.

This homeowner holds the attitude that when he meets/talks with the right agent he will "give" that agent the listing. Although not a savvy seller this homeowner believe he knows what questions to asks to be able to tell who the "right" agent is and proceeds to ask the agent this limited set (what is your fee, how long will it take to sell, etc.) of questions one after the other without allowing a fuller discussion because of his intention to collect the data from many agents and then "call back" the agent he intends to "give" the listing to (barring any difficulties or changes).

Left unchecked this is a potential problem for both the seller and the agent. The seller is operating from a limited data set, which could be the basis of a uniformed decision that ultimately costs him in time, money, and/or hassle (Foreclosure?). This can be a challenge for the agent because although he might have otherwise been the most qualified candidate because of the seller's un-savvy selection criteria he could be passed up (No Commission?).

The agent seeing the writing on the wall says to the seller, "That's great if you call back but I have to tell you... I usually turn down more listings than I accept and I can't guarantee without a little more information that I'd be able to accept your listing either." (Take-a-Way/We want what we can't have)

With that one sentence balance shifts from the seller to the agent. The agent now has the opportunity, which wasn't there before, to engage the seller in a sales conversation.

The agent skillfully influenced the seller to his advantage while maintaining the highest personal integrity and ethics and while dealing with the customer fairly and honestly. That too is manipulation. shds; - by SalesGuy
I'm relatively new to the profession of selling, but I can tell you that I have used this at least once with success. Some will argue that it is a manipulative tactic, but I would argue that buyers are often not truthful and forthcoming with their own intentions/desires which makes them manipulative as well. In negotiation, there are games played on both sides and this tactic is just one that levels the playing field. If you have the nerve to tell a girl you're crazy about that maybe you're not the one for her, then you have increased your desirability and given your self-esteem a boost. We are all professional that deserve to be treated with respect, but sometimes and in some situations, we have to be the ones who exhibit our own self respect. The take-away allows you to walk out the door with your head up high and maintains your confidence for the next meeting, and it closes the door so that you don't keep getting strung along by the non-committal prospect. There are opportunity costs for everything you do. Spend your time wisely. - by jkatz1
We are all professional that deserve to be treated with respect, but sometimes and in some situations, we have to be the ones who exhibit our own self respect. The take-away allows you to walk out the door with your head up high and maintains your confidence for the next meeting, and it closes the door so that you don't keep getting strung along by the non-committal prospect. There are opportunity costs for everything you do. Spend your time wisely.
Are you sure you haven't been doing this a while? Good post. :thup - by Calvin
The take away close is one I've used when confronted with a second decision maker, which actually just happened today. We ended up meeting with an owner when we thought we were meeting with a VP, and found out they think differently (no big surprise). They were on the same page on some of what we had proposed (not formally yet). I found myself "taking away" the thing I thought they did agree on to get a sense of how likely it was that they would at least go with what they did agree on, and it worked like a charm. When I took it away, he had two options a) to say "it's true, i'm not that interested or b) but wait - yes, yes we do want that thing. Turned out to make it clear that we're still in, and now the other decision maker is on board too. Lucky, I'd say and yet not the least bit manipulative - rather it just told me what I needed to know so that I made sure I still had a buyer. Not gonna waste my time chasing windmills. I'm sure you'd all agree. I think we would have looked pathetic if we didn't insist on finding out for sure if he was on board. I find this to be a great example of how the take away is a good tool to use when you're headed towards a close, but not actually closing. What does everyone else think? - by WendyMcc
Amen - my sentiments exactly. In the end, what this "savvy" seller really wants is the one guy or woman who will challenge his approach and see through his facade. That salesperson who dares to challenge him and address what his real concern is (that he'll pick the wrong agent) will win his business, so it might as well be you!


As I mentioned earlier, IMO there is nothing inherently "wrong" with "manipulation". I'd go on to say that there is no "right" or "wrong" but thinking makes it so. This is why, IMO, what "matters" is your beliefs about manipulation.

If a person's experiences (referent) with manipulation have been negative, like those in your posts, it's not hard to see how he/she could form a less than favorable attitude towards the topic.

Let me provide an example where "manipulation" doesn't run contrary to "dealing with your customers fairly and honestly" or "the highest personal integrity and ethics".

Let's say that we're talking about a real estate agent who specializes in the listing and marketing of residential homes. A homeowner in the agent's area who wants to sell his home sees the agent's sign in a neighbor's yard and calls to inquire about the agent's services.

This homeowner holds the attitude that when he meets/talks with the right agent he will "give" that agent the listing. Although not a savvy seller this homeowner believe he knows what questions to asks to be able to tell who the "right" agent is and proceeds to ask the agent this limited set (what is your fee, how long will it take to sell, etc.) of questions one after the other without allowing a fuller discussion because of his intention to collect the data from many agents and then "call back" the agent he intends to "give" the listing to (barring any difficulties or changes).

Left unchecked this is a potential problem for both the seller and the agent. The seller is operating from a limited data set, which could be the basis of a uniformed decision that ultimately costs him in time, money, and/or hassle (Foreclosure?). This can be a challenge for the agent because although he might have otherwise been the most qualified candidate because of the seller's un-savvy selection criteria he could be passed up (No Commission?).

The agent seeing the writing on the wall says to the seller, "That's great if you call back but I have to tell you... I usually turn down more listings than I accept and I can't guarantee without a little more information that I'd be able to accept your listing either." (Take-a-Way/We want what we can't have)

With that one sentence balance shifts from the seller to the agent. The agent now has the opportunity, which wasn't there before, to engage the seller in a sales conversation.

The agent skillfully influenced the seller to his advantage while maintaining the highest personal integrity and ethics and while dealing with the customer fairly and honestly. That too is manipulation. shds;
- by WendyMcc
The Take Away is a powerful sales tactic that can aid the sales person in advancing the sale. I would strongly contend that it is not inherently manipulative. However, some earlier in this thread have rightly pointed out how it can be abused if used dishonestly. This does not negate the legitimacy and potency of the Take Away it simply highlights that lack on integrity of the sales people who abuse the tactic and their prospect.

I think a second reason the Take Away is so misunderstood is that there is little to no good training on it. Few sales books even cover it and when they do it is a brief summary that raises more questions than answers. - by Harold
Prior to using the take away or I call it the "drop dead" close, I often called what I thought were prospects way too many times. I wasted my time and theirs as well as being a source of irritation to them, no matter how creative I was.

Here it is "Bob, I have called twice previously, and you must be very busy. I wish I could continue to call for your decision, however, I don't like being a pest. This will be the last time you hear from me regarding X. Should I not hear from you by Friday, I will assume you are not interested and wish you much luck in your business.

This must be said in a very adult voice and if the prospect feels in any way you are not sincere (don't use it if you aren't sincere in his or your best interests) he will not have a favorable impression of you as a professional. - by triadtraining
In my industry, I use it every time. I say "i don't know if this is for you"...and it always works. - by mgrigsby
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