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Assuming the sale?

How effective is assuming the sale during a presentation? i.e. using language such as;

"what we're going to do for you is..."
"what colour would you like that in?"
"what address would you like that sent to"

I'd imagine it is effective in some situations, and facilitates the close, however for others might it be insulting to their intelligence? - by sales_ace
How effective is assuming the sale during a presentation? i.e. using language such as;

"what we're going to do for you is..."
"what colour would you like that in?"
"what address would you like that sent to"

I'd imagine it is effective in some situations, and facilitates the close, however for others might it be insulting to their intelligence?
Assuming the sale impacts sales in two ways:

(1) It effects the salesperson. If your self-talk is one of success, you're more likely to be successful.

(2) If effects the customer. Saying "when you get this widget, you'll notice how it does such-and-such" tends to build more sales momentum than "if you go ahead and get this widget, you'd notice how it does such-and-such" does the opposite.

There's a time and place to use assumptive language.

I don't think your second and third examples are good examples of "assuming the sale." I think they're better examples of determining needs and closing the sale, respectively. - by Skip Anderson
Just wanted to throw my 2 cents in somewhere and this seems as good a place as any. I think assuming the sale is most important internally. I train all my sales staff to work and perform with an attitude that of course everyone will buy from us. That type of confidence comes threw e-mails, phone calls and visits.

Be careful about the words you use in front of the client though as they may take offense that you expect them to buy from you.. Better to just have the attitude.thmbp2; - by Landisintaiwan
Be careful about the words you use in front of the client though as they may take offense that you expect them to buy from you.. Better to just have the attitude.thmbp2;
I totally agree, some sales scripts I have seen are assuming to the point of aggressiveness. eg. "What we'll do for you is bla bla... Right. What I'll do is sign you up, can I take your name please?".. This may happen five minutes into a conversation and personaly, I don't like being forced into a direction. I find the boundary between a sales pitch and the close very difficult to see in such circumstances and I am inclined to say that such conversations are one just long 'sales close'. - by nesh thompson
it works if you have 'Credibility Upon Entry' (I did not invent that term). Our websites, a blog, and other social media tools have changed the characteristics of the sales pipeline. Our first conversation with the prospect occurs much later in the sales cycle than it used to.

Done well, by the time we have our first conversation with the prospect, they have already made the decision to buy, and to buy from us.

So if you sense that the prospect has done their research, already knows about you has visited your blog, etc, then yes, by all means assume the sale has been made. - by dbarnhart
How effective is assuming the sale during a presentation? i.e. using language such as;

"what we're going to do for you is..."
I think this is very effective. It facilitates a state of mind for the Buyer and the Seller that leads to a desired outcome. - by Houston
I always try to speak to the customer as if it's inevitable that they are coming on board with us. During the presentation it's "with us you will have x available." or "This is just another service we provide for you."

if they are dead serious, but a little wishy washy, I'll just pull out the paperwork and start filling it out. (my boss liked that one by the way, called it the best assumed close he's seen)

Pat - by toolguy_35
I don't assume. I know my beliefs and passion. I know my ability to communicate. I find out if someone wants to know more, wants to look at what I offer. I assume a YES means YES but could change. I can also change my mind if the prospect isn't reliable. I don't need troubles down the road.

"In order to respond appropriately to the changing reality of every second and to the changes of the future, one must have a free, responsive mind, undisturbed by prejudice." Morihei Ueshiba creater of aikido

I find that responsive mind set along with the authority and conviction through which I speak is sufficient.

MitchM - by MitchM
How effective is assuming the sale during a presentation? i.e. using language such as;
I'd imagine it is effective in some situations, and facilitates the close, however for others might it be insulting to their intelligence?
IMO the assumptive is a very effective tool it will either facilitate the close or uncover an objection, eitherway it will tell you how to proceed with the next step.

As far as insulting peoples intelegence that's just horse sh*t if your infront of anybody doing a presentation/demonstration and they have no idea that your job is to sell them something, your not doing your job effectively. In most casses people will cut you off withen the first minute, if they arent even remotely interested in what you have to offer.

Assume the sale all the way to the bank, don't worry about hurting their feelings, you gotta pay your bills.

~James - by Mr. Cesario
It seems to me that if you're uncomfortable any where in the cycle being assumptive, something is wrong. If you've done your homework in terms of qualifying the prospect, then, you must be assumptive throughout.

Being assumptive doesn't lock the SR into a close on every call! It's not about salivating everytime we get past the screen. Rather, it's a subtle undertone which implies a positive flow throughout the entire cycle (ie. cold call thru to close) whatever length of time is required.

"Assuming the sale" does not imply that the customer will not be instrumental in the process. Nor does it have any negative connotation of which I'm aware.

In point of fact, if you've slipped over the edge and you see a reaction from your prospect, it's easily recovered. For example, you can ask if they sell a product or service (which pretty much covers the gamut). Follow that immediately with, "... how would your P&L look if your SRs were out there not being positive about the opportunity ...".

Remember: we're "sales people" after all and asuming the sale is our mantra. We need to be positive about our ourselves and our offering. Or, perhaps, it's time to move on ...

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
"If you've done your homework in terms of qualifying the prospect, then, you must be assumptive throughout." -- Pat

That's the qualifier Pat nailed - you followed through with a high probability prospect with commitments. The rest is meeting conditions of satisfaction that are mutual.

MitchM - by MitchM
If you are delivering a presentation and have gotten all the issues on the table that the prospect needs resolved, have a solution that fits within the budget that the prospect has and you are meeting with the decision maker who has agreed to 'give you a decision', then you can be sure you will get a decision; unless of course you do something wrong.

Does it mean you will get the sale, is something else? - by Paulette Halpern
While there is a time and place for Assumptive Closing, before you get to that point in the Sales process, start using "Trial Closes" which will Rate their Interest and indicate if they are ready for you to start using actual Closes. Try variations of:
How does this sound so far?
Is this close to what you've been looking for?
Does this feel like it might meet your needs?

Trial CLoses only ask for their Opinion and are non-threatening. Also appreciate that we've used 3 of the 5 Senses which make for great Emotional involvement.

Have a "FANTA$TIC" Future!
Stan Billue, CSP - by Stan Billue
If you don't believe buying your product is the best and only logical decision to make, why should your prospect believe so?

The Sales Artist - by The Sales Artist
While there is a time and place for Assumptive Closing, before you get to that point in the Sales process, start using "Trial Closes" which will Rate their Interest and indicate if they are ready for you to start using actual Closes. Try variations of:
How does this sound so far?
Is this close to what you've been looking for?
Does this feel like it might meet your needs?

Trial CLoses only ask for their Opinion and are non-threatening. Also appreciate that we've used 3 of the 5 Senses which make for great Emotional involvement.

Have a "FANTA$TIC" Future!
Stan Billue, CSP
I am tuned in to Stan's perspective on this. In my own case, I "assume" success. It's a promise I make to myself, and so far I have delivered on that promise. But I treat every appointment beforehand as if it was the toughest appointment I will ever face. In doing so, I come prepared. Mere assumption, justified or not, gives way to the knowledge that if I prepare myself, and present myself and my products with a powerful intention to deliver on my promises, I will make a very good living. I treat selling as hard work, but the good news is that I like hard work, along with its rewards. - by Ace Coldiron
Sales Ace, there's some confusion percolating to the surface relating to separate topics:
1. "assuming the sale"; and,
2. "assumptive closes";

"Assuming the sale" is a virtual state of mind in which the SR believes in a positive outcome.

An "assumptive close" is a tool with which to ask for the order by assuming a positive response. For example, "(without having the order signed) will Bernice be ordering the supplies?" OR, "(again without a signed order in-place) what is the invoicing address?".

I'm also seeing that this started with "presentation" which to me implies a formal phase in the cycle (perhaps with PowerPoint). But it could be that, to some, the "presentation" phase is where the dialogue takes place (ie. discovery phase).

Having a sales lexicon does work marvels ...

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
I love this technique. If you are not sure that the customer is going to buy your products, the customer wont be sure either.

The best way to go for the close is to assume the customer already said okey.
Especially if you are giving them a better price, you have to know that they have said yes to your new price. Otherwise you will never get the contract signed. - by LookingDaniel
Assuming the sale is key! Of course, you cannot guarantee a sale every time. However, a prospect is more likely to be converted into a buyer when the sales person they are dealing with has a positive "can do" attitude...still there are aspects beyond the control of the sales person, like dynamics personal to the buyer that will prevent. A tire kicker will never buy. Interfacing with more contacts will yield more customers much more easily when you are confident, well prepared, knowledgeable and willing to help your customer to serve their needs rather than your own. Sometimes the sales person erroneously thinks that assuming the sale is enough. It is only the beginning. It is just one component that serves as the springboard.
Craig Edmund Klepin, MBA - by Guru4sale
I don't assume. I know my beliefs and passion. I know my ability to communicate. I find out if someone wants to know more, wants to look at what I offer. I assume a YES means YES but could change. I can also change my mind if the prospect isn't reliable. I don't need troubles down the road.

"In order to respond appropriately to the changing reality of every second and to the changes of the future, one must have a free, responsive mind, undisturbed by prejudice." Morihei Ueshiba creater of aikido

I find that responsive mind set along with the authority and conviction through which I speak is sufficient.

MitchM
I like what Mitch said here.

Assumptions are not part of the path I personally follow in life. They got me in trouble in the past, both in business and my daily living. For me to subscribe to the notion of assuming the sale would be departing from what works for me. But the fact is that, in selling, I never assumed the sale as far as I can remember. Yet, my personal closing ratio has been unparalleled in the arena that I have worked in. The best education always comes from our own experience PROVIDING we remain awake, alert, and aware. - by Gary A Boye
If you have a prospect and don't assume the sale, then you make an assume...........you put the spaces in!!! - by triadtraining
If you have a prospect and don't assume the sale, then you make an assume...........you put the spaces in!!!
If you recall, that tired old cliche' referred to those who DO assume. - by Gary A Boye
Yes!!!! Good thinking............. - by triadtraining
I like the post by Stan Billue and Assumptive Closing.I am in B2C telesales, our telephone presentation is relatively short,our product is not all that expensive and is easy for the prospect to understand.
After the initial introduction we ask some qualifying/discovery questions and then do our presentation. During the presentation we use some "Trial Closes". At the end of the presentation we use what I presume would be called " Assumptive/ Alternative Choice" closes.
ie.
a] May I send your gold card to your PO Box or your street address ?
b]Just to confirm I have the spelling of your surname as.....

In terms of assuming the sale.When I pick up the phone I intend to make the sale. I also like to assume I am going to get the sale.If I dont believe I am going to make a sale then why pick up the phone ?

I am here to learn and appreciate any feedback.
Positive Regards - by salesdog
If I dont believe I am going to make a sale then why pick up the phone ?

I am here to learn and appreciate any feedback.
Positive Regards
There are several answers to your question. Here are five.
  1. To FIND OUT if you're going to make a sale.
  2. To find out if the prospect is qualified to buy, i.e, ready, willing, and able.
  3. To find out if the prospect WANTS what you sell.
  4. To find out if the prospect NEEDS what you sell.
  5. Because if DON'T pick up the phone..none of the above is going to happen.
- by Gary A Boye
How effective is assuming the sale during a presentation? i.e. using language such as;
Speaking from personal experience this is what I believe; There is a huge difference in "assuming" and a deep down "belief". If you sincerely believe in your product and your ability to present your product then...that humble confidence will clearly show. When I say, this is what I have in mind for you or, this is what will happen when you or, yours will look like this, I am giving ownership. I am helping the client see himself owning my product. I am taking my product out of my hands and putting it into his. From that point on it belongs to him. Again, I am giving him ownership. - by MPrince
good stuff Martha! - by triadtraining
Assuming the close can be a risky sales tactic long term, because a prospect can end up feeling like they were manipulated into buying = no long term client relationship. When I hear examples like "When can I put you down for your installation" it reminds me of a very bad assumptive technique that a person selling makeup in my neighborhood tried on me years ago..."When would you like to host your party?". How about never?

I agree that assuming prospects and customers are interested is important in terms of having confidence and being assertive. However, one must be careful not to be too pushy. Since we know that so much of the buying decision is based off of how likeable a sales rep is and how the prospect feels about the seller, appearing manipulative is the quickest way to kill rapport and hurt the sale. Sure, it may work in some cases, but it's not something that I would endorse or recommend as a profit building strategy to my coaching clients. - by CoachMaria
Assuming the close can be a risky sales tactic long term, because a prospect can end up feeling like they were manipulated into buying = no long term client relationship. When I hear examples like "When can I put you down for your installation" it reminds me of a very bad assumptive technique that a person selling makeup in my neighborhood tried on me years ago..."When would you like to host your party?". How about never?

I agree that assuming prospects and customers are interested is important in terms of having confidence and being assertive. However, one must be careful not to be too pushy. Since we know that so much of the buying decision is based off of how likeable a sales rep is and how the prospect feels about the seller, appearing manipulative is the quickest way to kill rapport and hurt the sale. Sure, it may work in some cases, but it's not something that I would endorse or recommend as a profit building strategy to my coaching clients.
I agree with your thoughts on this topic. - by Gary A Boye
So...if I need to make another appointment to close a sale, which is not unusual in my business, and I say, " okay Mr Prospect when can I get back to you to get your decision". I am assuming that Mr Prospect wants to see me again? Am I being too pushy? Or, am I believing Mr Prospect will make another appointment? And, by the way, before I go into a business I can see myself making the sale. As far as I am concerned it is a done deal. I just have to work out the details. I am able to do that without EVER making my prospect feel manipulated. Being pushy or manipulative is not in my mental makeup but believing Mr. Prospect would benefit from my product and helping him see that is my goal. - by MPrince
So...if I need to make another appointment to close a sale, which is not unusual in my business, and I say, " okay Mr Prospect when can I get back to you to get your decision". I am assuming that Mr Prospect wants to see me again? Am I being too pushy? Or, am I believing Mr Prospect will make another appointment? And, by the way, before I go into a business I can see myself making the sale. As far as I am concerned it is a done deal. I just have to work out the details. I am able to do that without EVER making my prospect feel manipulated. Being pushy or manipulative is not in my mental makeup but believing Mr. Prospect would benefit from my product and helping him see that is my goal.
Martha, would you say that these would be close to describing your assumptions in the scenarios you shared with us (particularly in reference to the words I put in bold font)?

1. a looking forward to; anticipation

2. a looking for as due, proper, or necessary

3. a thing looked forward to

4. a reason or warrant for looking forward to something; prospect for the future, as of advancement or prosperity

5. the probability of the occurrence, duration, etc. of something, esp. as indicated by statistics - by Gary A Boye
I have heard both good and bad reports from my team in the field.

If you are "selling" to a "seller" you may get shot-down with such language as it is, at times, challenging to sell to a salesperson.

However, when dealing with a prospect who is clearly interested and engaged in the sales conversation and process, this seems to work well.

What also works for my team is when we can get the PROSPECT to repeat back to us whatever the positive result they will enjoy as a result of our product/service being in their hands. This gets the prospect REALLY taking ownership. It also gives you instant credibility as you are no longer "telling" the prospect about the features/benefits but rather "sharing" in their realization.

thmbp2; - by rgp3man
This is certainly a good thread to revisit.

One thing that clearly stands out if you delve into this subject is that there is a huge difference between ASSUMPTION and INTENTION.

My own experience in business, selling, and life takes precedent over sales lore. Intention is powerful and can get you where you want to go. Assumption is fraught with bear traps, disillusionment, and, sometimes, distorted thinking. It is the quintessential map that is NOT the territory.

Good placard to hang on your wall: Assume Nothing.

Stay with Intention. - by Gary A Boye
Gary, great thought (especially for those in training). - by OUTSource Sales
Gary, great thought (especially for those in training).
Thanks! Welcome back! - by Gary A Boye
I like your comment on getting your prospect to verbalize something positive about your product. It is a whole lot easier when the prospect starts closing himself than when a pushy salesperson starts pushing various closes on a prospect who may not be ready to close.
Lots of great stuff in this revisited thread. Very impressive.

I have heard both good and bad reports from my team in the field.

If you are "selling" to a "seller" you may get shot-down with such language as it is, at times, challenging to sell to a salesperson.

However, when dealing with a prospect who is clearly interested and engaged in the sales conversation and process, this seems to work well.

What also works for my team is when we can get the PROSPECT to repeat back to us whatever the positive result they will enjoy as a result of our product/service being in their hands. This gets the prospect REALLY taking ownership. It also gives you instant credibility as you are no longer "telling" the prospect about the features/benefits but rather "sharing" in their realization.

thmbp2;
- by triadtraining
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