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Will a sale close itself?

Is "closing" even necessary or will a sale close itself? - by Agent Smith
Is "closing" even necessary or will a sale close itself?
Sometimes it is necessary but often a sale can "close itself". I think if the sales process takes a correct course, the closing is often just a natural conclusion. - by Gary Boye
Sometimes it is necessary but often a sale can "close itself". I think if the sales process takes a correct course, the closing is often just a natural conclusion.
A few months ago I told a friend about my products, he said he didn't want them, I told him that if he ever changed his mind let me know. Last week he let me know he changed his mind.

I met with him this morning, I asked him if he was sure he wanted them because they had to be used properly to be effective, he asked me what that meant and I told him and asked him again if he wanted them he'd have to use them properly to be effective for him, and he told me he would.

The first time price ever came up was when I was writing the sales receipt. That's one example of a sale being the natural conclusion of what someone buying something he wants from someone who has it.

Closing, or closure is always necessary if a sale is to be made. - by MitchM
Closing, or closure is always necessary if a sale is to be made.
Closing and closure are two different things. Closing usually implies creating closure. The existence of closure can result even without an active closing step by the seller. - by Gary Boye
Closing and closure are two different things. Closing usually implies creating closure. The existence of closure can result even without an active closing step by the seller.
You guys are good. :D - by Agent Smith
You guys are good. :D
I see the difference, Gary, the difference doesn't have to be subtle. Then are the best sales a balance of closing and closure or do they lean one way or another? Or am I departmentalizing too much? - by MitchM
Closing and closure are two different things. Closing usually implies creating closure. The existence of closure can result even without an active closing step by the seller.
"Closure" might be viewed as the conclusion or satisfaction in the mind of the buyer that proceeeding with the transaction is something he/she wants to do and "Closing" might be viewed as the obtainment of a specific commitment.

Will a sales close itself? Rarely. ;) - by SalesGuy
"Closure" might be viewed as the conclusion or satisfaction in the mind of the buyer that proceeeding with the transaction is something he/she wants to do and "Closing" might be viewed as the obtainment of a specific commitment.

Will a sales close itself? Rarely. ;)
It's impossible to escape cause and effect - what is the cause and what is the effect and how they work together from different wants makes the transaction happen. - by MitchM
It's impossible to escape cause and effect - what is the cause and what is the effect and how they work together from different wants makes the transaction happen.
I must need more coffee :) because I'm not seeing the connection between those two posts. :o - by Agent Smith
I must need more coffee :) because I'm not seeing the connection between those two posts. :o
Nah, I probably made some kind of connection with out any transitions or links except in my mine, AgentSmith. I was thinking when I posted cause and effect that the whole closing thing is a mutual meeting of wants culminating in a purchase and the cause and effect from each side of the table is a dynamic worth many kinds of consideration. - by MitchM
...and the cause and effect from each side of the table is a dynamic worth many kinds of consideration.
I can see that. It reminds me of the importance I place on the investigating stage of the sale. - by Agent Smith
Is "closing" even necessary or will a sale close itself?
A presentation may go so well and so perfectly meet the needs of the prospect that closing is simply the natural conclusion, but at the risk of sounding cliched, closing is asking for the sale, and to me this is not an optional component in the process. I have stated this before, but to me it is inevitable: Even when a prospect has decided to buy, I believe he will wait for you to ask him to take action. Otherwise, he will stand there, staring at you, as to say "so....what next?" - by RainMaker
A presentation may go so well and so perfectly meet the needs of the prospect that closing is simply the natural conclusion, but at the risk of sounding cliched, closing is asking for the sale, and to me this is not an optional component in the process. I have stated this before, but to me it is inevitable: Even when a prospect has decided to buy, I believe he will wait for you to ask him to take action. Otherwise, he will stand there, staring at you, as to say "so....what next?"
That sounds about right. ;) - by SalesGuy
A presentation may go so well and so perfectly meet the needs of the prospect that closing is simply the natural conclusion, but at the risk of sounding cliched, closing is asking for the sale, and to me this is not an optional component in the process. I have stated this before, but to me it is inevitable: Even when a prospect has decided to buy, I believe he will wait for you to ask him to take action. Otherwise, he will stand there, staring at you, as to say "so....what next?"
Yes--exactly. Inexperienced salespeople are taught to not "talk yourself past the close." What next is the close in action. The best closing questions in that scenario probably should include an action phrase that would translate as putting pen to paper--at least figuratively. - by Gary Boye
I believe he will wait for you to ask him to take action. Otherwise, he will stand there, staring at you, as to say "so....what next?"
If this is the case do you think that the presentation may have lacked a little in explaining exactly what you were requesting as a commitment from the customer. I think that some sales will practically close themselves, otherwise a little nudge to help the customer decide is necessary. - by Doc MC
The closing will naturally come when the salesperson feel that the customers have agreed to the deal. So, the closing might come in the form of setting up the delivery schedule for the customers. - by khunvi
yes of course! Why not if you have the very best product in market, no comparetitions, customers are as many as water in sea. - by nhocaokeu
Absolutely! Closing is the natural end to the sales process. Where we sales people get into trouble, is when we get lazy, and try to skip steps and still get the close to happen naturally. When you skip steps, you create no value, and end up selling on price.
For me, I was always very low key with a closing question. Any type of 'eiither or' question works well. Would you rather do a wire or a check for the deposit? At this point, they're deciding on payment methods, not whether they're going to buy.
If they're not sold, here comes an objection. Time to start the process over!

Cheers

Susan - by susana
I think customers are alway lazy. Althrought they made their decisions to purchase one product but they still lazy and do nothing. Sales jobs are to find these demand and push and push customer until they have to make clear their underlying decisions. It's you are closing sales. - by nhocaokeu
I think customers are alway lazy. Althrought they made their decisions to purchase one product but they still lazy and do nothing. Sales jobs are to find these demand and push and push customer until they have to make clear their underlying decisions. It's you are closing sales.
:hu

Believe it or not, I think I understand what you are saying. ;wi - by Houston
Is "closing" even necessary or will a sale close itself?
That depends. Some people some of the time need help making a decision, and some don't. - by fred
Without exception, everyone of our best sales has had the appearance and feel of closing itself. By that I mean that those who bought engaged in a dialogue with us looking for solutions and there was no resistance or struggle - one thing led to another and that was that - every one.

Obviously things don't happen by themselves - something has to carry a message and conclude a process, supply a demand.

On the other hand, with only a few exceptions, every one of our worse sales meaning eventually they quit had the appearance and feel of struggle and resistance.

Jacque Werth's book "High Probability Selling" gave me insight into this and now I understand why these best and worse sales.

MitchM - by MitchM
That depends. Some people some of the time need help making a decision, and some don't.
Short but sweet. :) - by Agent Smith
On the other hand, with only a few exceptions, every one of our worse sales meaning eventually they quit had the appearance and feel of struggle and resistance.
If you're getting that kind of struggle and resistance then you're doing it wrong. With a little training you should be able to get the bugs out. - by fred
I got the bugs out - that was in the past - that's why no struggle, no tension, no resistance.

MitchM - by MitchM
Obviously things don't happen by themselves...
I'm with you on that. ;) - by AZBroker
I can see you are a wise man who knows good common sense in a cliche as ordinary as "obviously things don't happen by themselves," AZBroker

MitchM - by MitchM
I can see you are a wise man who knows good common sense in a cliche as ordinary as "obviously things don't happen by themselves," AZBroker
Thank you, thank you very much. (...my best Elvis impression) - by AZBroker
My guess, AZ, is that you probably were a fan of Elvis in his later years when he wore big white capes and sang ballads out of key to LV audiences. Am I spot on?

MitchM - by MitchM
My guess, AZ, is that you probably were a fan of Elvis in his later years when he wore big white capes and sang ballads out of key to LV audiences. Am I spot on?

MitchM
Not at all... closer to the Jailhouse Rock years. ;co - by AZBroker
Will a sales close itself? Rarely. ;)
True and when it doesn't it's the salesman's responsibility to ask for the order. - by saltydog
True and when it doesn't it's the salesman's responsibility to ask for the order.
I can agree with this. - by Agent Smith
I think a great presentation and a great follow up call will help the sale "close itself". Although it does take a great salesperson to close the deal, you will find the occasional sale close by itself. - by wlctrent
Gary's disticntion of the "Closure" concept is brilliant.

"Closure" might be viewed as the conclusion or satisfaction in the mind of the buyer that proceeeding with the transaction is something he/she wants to do and "Closing" might be viewed as the obtainment of a specific commitment.

Will a sales close itself? Rarely. ;)
You are getting real close.

Closing requests a commitment.
If you weave a “request for commitment” into every need, every solution, every feature and every question you and the prospect discuss, it adds up to many commitments. It is easy to get at least 30 commitments during a one-hour sales visit. Furthermore, if the prospect trusts you and respects you, any objections will be handled as part of those commitments.

The natural culmination of all those commitments is the question, “Are you confident that we can meet all of your conditions of satisfaction?

If the prospect says “Yes,” you say, “What do you want to do?” In most cases, the propect will create closure. And, it is quite rare for people to destroy their own creation.

Note: We never ask for the order. - by JacquesWerth
The natural culmination of all those commitments is the question, “Are you confident that we can meet all of your conditions of satisfaction?

If the prospect says “Yes,” you say, “What do you want to do?” In most cases, the propect will create closure. And, it is quite rare for people to destroy their own creation.

Note: We never ask for the order.
If asking, "What do you want to do?" is not an example of asking for the order what is? - by AZBroker
Behold.....the story of the puppet master;bg . What I have found is that the most influencial people who have the most to do with success are not the people that you notice much at all. You see....the close ALWAYS has to do with you, there is no "magic sale" unless the customer has already researched the product and price elsewhere and comes in with the decision to buy.
The key is not to look for the "magic" in a sale....because magic does not exist in sales....it is a science. Though understanding the illusion behind the "magic" you seek, is the angle I believe you should attempt to approach if you feel like what I am saying pertains to your success.
The customer should (in a perfect world) never suspect you are pulling the strings, and I am not saying that you should "control" your customer because then they will sense it and get defensive....but moreso I am suggesting that you be "sensitive" to each person and listen enough to understand their motivations for buying so that you can provide a common ground where they will feel more comfortable with your suggestions (because they resemble their own!!;bg ).
Know the right triggers to flip at the right time......work smart not hard my friend, if you search for the "magic sale" you will pass by all the other oppurtunities you could have made into sales.;wi
You and only you can close the sale....its just how you do it that determines your success rate.
And don't worry.....it is something I have been working on since I have started!;st
I hope this helps you,
sincerely,
David
- by truesaxman
"Closing requests a commitment.
If you weave a “request for commitment” into every need, every solution, every feature and every question you and the prospect discuss, it adds up to many commitments. It is easy to get at least 30 commitments during a one-hour sales visit. Furthermore, if the prospect trusts you and respects you, any objections will be handled as part of those commitments.

The natural culmination of all those commitments is the question, “Are you confident that we can meet all of your conditions of satisfaction?

If the prospect says “Yes,” you say, “What do you want to do?” In most cases, the propect will create closure. And, it is quite rare for people to destroy their own creation." -- JW

The last paragraph really stands out - thanks!
--------------
I see a big difference in asking "What do you want to do" and "Are you ready to sign?" or "Can we make it a deal?" or "Well let's finish the paper work and get you out the door."

They're not the same, AZ, because the latter three examples fail to put the decision in the buyer's hand, the signature on the creation, and they force an issue.

MitchM - by MitchM
if you search for the "magic sale" you will pass by all the other oppurtunities you could have made into sales.
That's a fact Jack! ;wi

They're not the same, AZ, because the latter three examples fail to put the decision in the buyer's hand, the signature on the creation, and they force an issue.
Jacques' remarks are on the money. - by AZBroker
I don't know what you by Jacques's being on the money relative to what you quoted from me, AZ. Tome it's like so many cliches people throw out that cover all but reveal nothing - what do you mean?

MitchM - by MitchM
I grabbed the wrong quote. It should have been:

"Closing requests a commitment.
If you weave a “request for commitment” into every need, every solution, every feature and every question you and the prospect discuss, it adds up to many commitments. It is easy to get at least 30 commitments during a one-hour sales visit. Furthermore, if the prospect trusts you and respects you, any objections will be handled as part of those commitments.

The natural culmination of all those commitments is the question, “Are you confident that we can meet all of your conditions of satisfaction?

If the prospect says “Yes,” you say, “What do you want to do?” In most cases, the propect will create closure. And, it is quite rare for people to destroy their own creation." -- JW
- by AZBroker
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