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Ask for the business

When the sales call is just about over and you think the prospect wants to do the deal but hasn't come out and said so what is the best way to ask for the business? - by realtor
Your prospect is not going to tell you, that is your job and you must ask.

Here are some questions to assist,

If the information reflects our discussion when would you like to begin?
Is there anything detaining us from beginning the work?
How quickly are you ready to commence with the service?
Can we proceed now?

These are the questions that are vital to gaining commitment.

Good Selling.

Drew - by Drew Stevens
The only way you would think that the prospect is ready to buy is if you fully executed your plan going in, have confirmed that the prospect is moving in the same direction at the same pace as you. If that is the case, then the best way is summarize, and state the obvious conclusion, "we should move forward on the basis of what we have discussed and agreed on" and then be prepared for their response.

Tibor Shanto - by Tibor Shanto
If you have accurately assessed your prospect's situation and needs and presented the right solution, then you have earned the right to ask for the sale. Here are few non-threatening ways to ask:

Are you ready to move forward with this decision?
Can I get started on the paperwork?
Can I write this up?
When do you want to take care of the paperwork?
Are you ready to do business?
When do you want to start?

As Drew mentioned, it is your responsibility to ask for the sale.

Cheers!
Kelley - by Kelley Robertson
Soft - say, "What would you like me to do next?"
Soft - ask about an after sale detail like delivery, training, or support. In old parlance this is the 'assumptive close'.
From the heart, "you seem about ready to decide, shall we go ahead with the paper work?"
Harder - "How would you like to proceed?"
Harder - "let's not delay getting the results you want"

Which to use? That's a judgment call. It depends, and only the sales person there in the moment can make it.

Clive - by Clive Miller
If the Prospect hasn't indicated they are ready to place the Order then you run the risk of adding Pressure to the process by asking a "Closing Question" . Instead, try using a "Trial Close" which only asks for their Opinion rather than a Decision. Examples:
"How does everything sound so far?"
"Does this feel like it will fill your needs?"
"Is this looking like it what you were hoping for?"

If they respond less than positive with; "I'm still not sure", then you will realize they weren't ready to be Sold and you need to go back to covering Benefits and handling any Questions and/or Concerns before earning the right to try and Close the Sale.

If they respond very positive with; "It sure does", then you've just made your Sale and you can wrap things up with; "Great and here's what we need to do next."
thmbp2;

Have a "FANTA$TIC" Future!
Stan Billue, CSP - by Stan Billue
Thank you to the experts. :thu

I am very glad I asked this question because I wasn't confident that what I was doing was right but I am doing what has been suggested. Now I can stop rehashing it over and over again in my mind. Thank you! thmbp2; - by realtor
Good comments from everyone. I agree with Stan about the power of a trial close.

Here are commonly used closing actions:

Direct Question: "Should we go ahead and prepare an offer?" or "Do you want to buy it?"

Alternative Choice Close: "Do you want to make an offer right at the listing price, or do you want to beef up your offer to increase your likelihood of getting the home?"

Assumptive Close: [maybe after a trial close]. "So the next step is to write up an offer, so let's go back to my office."

The use of these various closes, and others, depends upon the particular situation, of course.

The best to you,

Skip - by Skip Anderson
When the sales call is just about over and you think the prospect wants to do the deal but hasn't come out and said so what is the best way to ask for the business?
The best procedure is as follows:

1. Summarize what has been