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What is the best sales question you have heard?

As a sales expert you get to hear all of the questions good and bad that your clients are using in the field. Have you heard any that you thought were great that other salespeople should be using? - by Community Mailbox
Depending on the Product or Service that you're selling, 3 great Questions to ask when they say they are happy with their present situation would be;
"Tell me the 3 things you like best about the (product) (service) (company) you're using now."
"If you had a Magic Wand, what are 2 or 3 things you might want to change?"
"Why would those be important to you?"
Many times these will help bring out a need or a problem that they either didn't realize they had or they weren't being completely honest with you in the first place.

Have a "FANTA$TIC" Future!
Stan Billue, CSP - by Stan Billue
"Why..." (Why do you say that?; Why do you feel that way? Why do you think that?; Why is that important?; etc.)

Happy questioning,

Skip - by Skip Anderson
As a sales expert you get to hear all of the questions good and bad that your clients are using in the field. Have you heard any that you thought were great that other salespeople should be using?
One I learned many years ago, and cannot remember WHO suggested it, was positioned as a power question for the concern, "Your price is too high." If it is appropriate, ask, "Compared to what?" When I have used this question I have had people go from a total blank on their face to an actual comparison that then allowed me to answer the prospects concern. - by patweber
"Tell me more about that..."

Keeps your contact talking, giving more information about their situation so you can better describe the fit of your solution. - by sfrenkel
I agree with Skip. One, simple question: Why?

Another way to ask this is, "what is the reason for _______?"

Usually, when people tell you about their problem or the "top 3 things they want," this is not REALLY what is going on. You need to get to the root, or cause, of things--only then are you at the emotional level where there is enough reason to make a change. - by Jake Atwood
Though a mildly commandatory request, it serves as a question:

"Tell me what you're thinking."

If you format it as a question, i.e., "What are you thinking.", it could be misinterpreted as offensive. "Tell me what you're thinking." is strong and can be highly engaging. - by Ace Coldiron
Questions that don't limit the responses are the best, as they ALLOW the prospect to talk. These are called OPEN PROBES ...

Limiting the responses is a closed probe, like when you want to confirm that you understood what a prospect mentioned while talking freely.

As crazy as this sounds to newbies, sometimes even WHY is complicated ... my favorite is "Oh?" or "Oh really" ... or course, this only works with those who are talking freely.

To me, this thread invites comments that are all over the map. Questions above include an about handling an objection, several are open probes used in uncovering needs/pain ... how about one that confirms that the prospect bought?

"If I CAN guarantee our results, meaning we can show you how we can increase your profit or we do not produce an invoice, then when would be convenient to go ahead with the two week - two man assessment we've been discussing, how is November 21st or would you prefer right after Thanksgiving?" - by Gold Calling
While not disagreeing with anything here said, the most important question to me is "may I have a few minutes of your time to get your opinion on... "

I like getting in front of a buyer as much as possible... apart from that, Feldman's let me put it together for you is an assumptive I guess that seems to work well as a "shall we go ahead with this then...

I'm still perplexed as to how I close... and I write stuff down EVERY MEETING... sales when they happen, just seem to happen and I'm not sure why... and when I figure it out, I'll