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Sales: A Definition

Wanted to start a dialogue on the definition of a sale and how that definition influences the methodology you use in the sales process. - by Joeylean
Wanted to start a dialogue on the definition of a sale and how that definition influences the methodology you use in the sales process.
That is not an easy question because you could go around and around with various definitions simply because of a variety of contexts. However, a good working model of definiton can be derived from an accounting principle that states delivery of the goods or services should have taken place for the sale to be recognized. That might seem a little too "green visor" for some, but if you are looking at Selling as a business, which, in my view, it really is, you can see where that "process" mentioned above truly ends. - by Ace Coldiron
Interesting insight Ace. How about from the sales person's perspective. For example, some define sales as the transfer of belief for a product or service and others would have a different definition. I am curious to see what sales people are defining a sale as and how that definition influences their sales methodologies and practices... - by Joeylean
"Wanted to start a dialogue on the [1] definition of a sale and [2] how that definition influences the methodology you use in the sales process." -- david

1. a sale is when someone buys what I sell

2. people will only buy what I sell when they A. know about it and B. believe or know it will be a solution for something they want.

Because of that, my methodology is to A. let people know what I have and B. find out if it's what they want and why.

MitchM - by MitchM
Wanted to start a dialogue on the definition of a sale and how that definition influences the methodology you use in the sales process.
A sale to me is when a transaction closes. What are the other choices? - by Thomas
"1. a sale is when someone buys what I sell

2. people will only buy what I sell when they A. know about it and B. believe or know it will be a solution for something they want.

Because of that, my methodology is to A. let people know what I have and B. find out if it's what they want and why.

MitchM
Let me, just for the sake of discussion, challenge you on that.

Would you agree that conditions of satisfaction should somehow play into the sales conversation/interview?

I have read a handful of your posts and I think you would agree with that.

SO---someone BUYS what you sell, right? And what if---what IF--they are not happy (satisfied)? Would you still maintain your position that the sale was complete when they bought what you sell?

I'll go you one better. What IF conditions of satisfaction, discussed up front, were not met in the customer's eyes, and you were in Account Management Sales? Tell me then where the sales starts and finishes, or if you believe it is a sale upon issuance of the purchase order. - by Ace Coldiron
Wanted to start a dialogue on the definition of a sale and how that definition influences the methodology you use in the sales process.
Hi David

Now this is an interesting one. I have been involved in sales for the last 30 years ! and am still learning.

Only a couple of months agao I discovered the world sales comes from the scandinavian word/phrase which means to be of service.

Now that really is relevant today. When to really connect with our clients and prospects we need to think about how we add value if we truly want a long term profitable relationship.

Sales is changing in the new business economy where collaboration and value are the key words that work,

Best Wishes

SalesManagerCoach;sm - by SalesManagersCoach
Let me, just for the sake of discussion, challenge you on that.

Would you agree that conditions of satisfaction should somehow play into the sales conversation/interview? YES

I have read a handful of your posts and I think you would agree with that. YES

SO---someone BUYS what you sell, right? And what if---what IF--they are not happy (satisfied)? Would you still maintain your position that the sale was complete when they bought what you sell? NO! I did a poor job - most of the time.

I'll go you one better. What IF conditions of satisfaction, discussed up front, were not met in the customer's eyes, and you were in Account Management Sales? Tell me then where the sales starts and finishes, or if you believe it is a sale upon issuance of the purchase order. I don't know what AMsales does but the situation you describe I would call an incomplete and poorly executed sale. Again, if that were me I did a poor job.

MitchM - by MitchM
I like David's question in this thread. However, in reading some of the other posts, it appears that some have gotten off the "definition" part of the question into "process" or "motivation" issues.

A definition of "birthday cake" doesn't have anything to do with the process of making a cake. There are many different ways to bake a cake, but the definition of "cake" remains consistent.

Then, other posts seem to confuse a "definition" of the word sale with trying to explain "why people buy." For instance, MitchM says:

"People will only buy what I sell when they A. know about it and B. believe or know it will be a solution for something they want."

The fact is, there are lots of reasons why people buy, but that's not the topic of this thread.

So I think it would be honorable to stay true to David's original question in this thread: "What is a definition of "sale"?

Here's a definition I like: "Exchange of a product or service in exchange for compensation." - by Skip Anderson
What you've done is miss the second part of David's question which is why you imply that "process" or "motivation" brought into the question does not honor the intent of the question.

"Wanted to start a dialogue on the definition of a sale and how that definition influences the methodology you use in the sales process" - David

David clearly wants to know more than a flat, dictionary definition, Skip. You give a good one; so do I; so do others.

Do this if you will, Skip - answer the second part of David's question "how that definition influences rhe methodology you use in the sales process" in a way that honors the first part "the definition of a sales" without refering to either process or metholology.

MitchM - by MitchM
Wanted to start a dialogue on the definition of a sale and how that definition influences the methodology you use in the sales process.
Skip, David's original question was as quoted above. It was not "What is a definition of "sale"? Everybody seems to have remained honorable after all.

With regard to David's insertion of "influenced the methodology", some selling systems have agreement on "conditions of satisfaction" as a component in the process. The process that Mitch uses has such, and I challenged him, I believe successfully, to observe that his original offering on "defintion" was not consistent. I believe also that the exchange between Mitch and myself was very much in keeping with the spirit of the dialogue that David sought. - by Ace Coldiron
David clearly wants to know more than a flat, dictionary definition, Skip. You give a good one; so do I; so do others.

Do this if you will, Skip - answer the second part of David's question "how that definition influences rhe methodology you use in the sales process" in a way that honors the first part "the definition of a sales" without refering to either process or metholology.

MitchM
Fair enough MitchM, I stand corrected. you are right.

David's second question is definitely about methodology and process.

Skip - by Skip Anderson
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