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Calling people on their bull****

I have this habit of calling people on their bull****. In the car business there is the phrase "buyers are liars." This, of course, is very, very, very true. However, I have this bad habit of calling them out when they lie too much. I mean, I'll ignore the first few lies, but after a while I call them on it. This tends to piss them off. My question is this: Is it ever right to esentially tell a customer, "look, I know you're full of ****, I'm not an idiot, let's be up front with each other and proceed by being honest" or should you ALWAYS keep quiet when you know they're full of it? - by wesbound
I would have no issue with letting people know in a professional manner that I feel the discussion doesn't appear to be above board. - by Jolly Roger
I have this habit of calling people on their bull****. In the car business there is the phrase "buyers are liars." This, of course, is very, very, very true. However, I have this bad habit of calling them out when they lie too much. I mean, I'll ignore the first few lies, but after a while I call them on it. This tends to piss them off. My question is this: Is it ever right to esentially tell a customer, "look, I know you're full of ****, I'm not an idiot, let's be up front with each other and proceed by being honest" or should you ALWAYS keep quiet when you know they're full of it?
It is very difficult to make sales if you p--- people off.

So maybe the wrong question is being asked here. Why not this one? Can liars be sold? - by Ace Coldiron
It's perfectly appropriate to call a customer on the bull. The trick is to do it in such a way that you can get beyond it and continue the selling process if possible. In other words, usually this confrontation needs to be refined and delicate and not aggressively confrontational.

Having said that, there are certainly times when it is appropriate to fire a prospect. - by Skip Anderson
It is very difficult to make sales if you p--- people off.

So maybe the wrong question is being asked here. Why not this one? Can liars be sold?
How about this one: Do you really WANT to sell to liars? - by Rainmaker
I have this habit of calling people on their bull****. In the car business there is the phrase "buyers are liars." This, of course, is very, very, very true. However, I have this bad habit of calling them out when they lie too much. I mean, I'll ignore the first few lies, but after a while I call them on it. This tends to piss them off. My question is this: Is it ever right to esentially tell a customer, "look, I know you're full of ****, I'm not an idiot, let's be up front with each other and proceed by being honest" or should you ALWAYS keep quiet when you know they're full of it?
Wesbound,

You can win the battle and lose the war...I prefer to take the whole glory ( making the sale and commission) home with me.

I'd like to hear what you're considering "lies" I probably already know what they're saying because I sold cars for 6 years in the early 80's and still have good friends in the business. Many of whom I trained personally.

Practically every "LIE" they tell you they already know you'll find out one way or the other. To many of them it's a game of cat and mouse. You're job is to let them play that game all the way to driving your car off the lot and have them happy as hell for it.

Anyway I'd like to hear what they're telling you and, if you don't mind, how you handle it. Other than telling them they're full of it.

Thanks,

Don - by DPinger
The question you have posed is very vague. You haven't given the circumstances or the frequency of these incidents.

That being said, if this is happening often I think you should first look at yourself to see if some thing you are doing or saying is causing people to lie to you. Second maybe you are targeting the wrong people in your marketing.

Next and probably most importantly, too many sales people think they have to work with every buyer that comes along, mainly because they don't have enough prospects in the funnel. If you market effectively to the right market, you can pick and choose who you want to work with. - by Jim Klein
Certainly if you go into a sales conversation beleiving that "buyers are liars" your entire approach will reflect that.

While there's nothing wrong with calling people on their B.S. if you do it in an aggressive or confrontational manner, you are only going to piss them off and they won't buy from you anyway. Put YOUR ego aside and focus on helping people make an educated buying decision.

Why do you think people lie to salespeople? Usually because they have been sold something that they didn't need or want by a salesperson who lied to them.

During my lifetime, I have only encountered one person in car sales who even came remotely close to EARNING my trust. All of the others were too focused on their own self-interest of closing the deal to pay attention to what I wanted or needed. I could go on a rant here, but I won't.

The bottom line, if you want people to trust you and be honest with you, you need to demonstrate that behavior first.

Cheers!
Kelley - by Kelley Robertson
Thanks, this made me chuckle.
What are these lies the client makes?They do not want the product or service can't afford,have to talk to a spouse or partner,I do not need it etc.
I actually get a kick out of the excuses the client makes.Some are real creative.The one thing I always realize,not one of the excuses said they could not pay my price. They were unwilling to pay my price until the information they received was enough to swing the weight of the product upwards and drop the weight of the hard earned dollar they had.
Try to look at lies as asking for more information.Remember those who give you the hardest time are actually the easiest client to guide. The problem ,they have been taken by some crooked sales people in the past and that is the resistence. - by rich34232
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