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Best and Most Cost Effective Way to Direct Market

What is the most Effective and Direct Way too Market that is Budget Effective without costing over the limit? - by Sanddollar
What is the most Effective and Direct Way too Market that is Budget Effective without costing over the limit?
What budget and how are you measuring effectiveness? - by SalesGuy
Cold calling is probably the cheapest way to go (although not the most pleasant). If you prefer to use mailing, I think it is much more effective if it is in conjunction with calling. I have NEVER had much luck with straight mailings and it can get expensive.

I am currently experimenting with a new direct mail idea: I call my target company and ask for the name of the decision maker. I then send them an inexpensive billfold in a hand addressed envelope which makes a curiously lumpy piece of mail. I attach a very short letter that starts out with: Why am I sending you this billfold? So I can help you fill it with money....." I then call them the next week to make an appointment to tell them about our "Fill The Billfold Challenge." The cost is a little over $1.83 a piece (which is still not bad), but I don't believe in "mass mailing." I think each piece should be hand picked, highly targeted, and followed up on if you want to get results.

So far, I've had good luck with this project, but I have not done it in a large enough quantity to draw any meaningful conclusions.

There is one advantage to being budget conscious: If forces you to nurture every lead and to find methods that are efficient. If you've got money to blow, direct marketing can become a black hole (especially if you think your first idea is dynamite and want to try it on a large scale!) - by RainMaker
So far, I've had good luck with this project, but I have not done it in a large enough quantity to draw any meaningful conclusions.
Obviously, every market is different, but maybe it will give you some creative ideas. I actually adapted this from an article I read about a pizza restaurant owner who stapled a small seasoning packet to his letter in order to get curiousity seekers to open it. - by RainMaker
Cold calling is probably the cheapest way to go (although not the most pleasant). If you prefer to use mailing, I think it is much more effective if it is in conjunction with calling. I have NEVER had much luck with straight mailings and it can get expensive.

I am currently experimenting with a new direct mail idea: I call my target company and ask for the name of the decision maker. I then send them an inexpensive billfold in a hand addressed envelope which makes a curiously lumpy piece of mail. I attach a very short letter that starts out with: Why am I sending you this billfold? So I can help you fill it with money....." I then call them the next week to make an appointment to tell them about our "Fill The Billfold Challenge." The cost is a little over $1.83 a piece (which is still not bad), but I don't believe in "mass mailing." I think each piece should be hand picked, highly targeted, and followed up on if you want to get results.

So far, I've had good luck with this project, but I have not done it in a large enough quantity to draw any meaningful conclusions.

There is one advantage to being budget conscious: If forces you to nurture every lead and to find methods that are efficient. If you've got money to blow, direct marketing can become a black hole (especially if you think your first idea is dynamite and want to try it on a large scale!)
Thats pretty Intresting and yeah Creativety and Curiosty can lead to nice Marketing Idea's gona try out your idea see how it works out.

Thanks! - by sandlayer
Thats pretty Intresting and yeah Creativety and Curiosty can lead to nice Marketing Idea's gona try out your idea see how it works out.

Thanks!
Great and good luck. Marketing, for me, is quite a bit of experimentation. What type of sales do you do, Sandlayer? - by RainMaker
I then send them an inexpensive billfold in a hand addressed envelope which makes a curiously lumpy piece of mail.
The ultimate goal of this experiment is make sales, but I always break down the goal of making a sale into a bunch of steps because I feel sales only flow in a series of steps (A to B to C to D...then sale.). Each step presents a possible hurdle but my goal at each hurdle is only to get to the next step--not to worry about the sale which is ususally only possible after step "D" is achieved.

The purpose of the lumpy envelope is to get my piece opened and read. (Step "A") Today someone said to me: "I got a lot of mail last week, but THAT one I remember."

Whether or not this experiment will lead to sales, I have gained a small victory. I have discovered how to get my mailers opened (and even remembered). - by RainMaker
As an internet Direct Marketer, I use Google Adwords to test my ad copy and split test the ads to find an the "sweet spot" in my ad campaign.

From that targeted referral, I make sure that the link goes to a specific landing page that is tailored to that visitors "worldview" and create the copy for that landing page (I also split test this).

With the tracking software and systematic monitoring, I don't have to guess which copy is better... the data tells me :)

You can set your budget on Google so you don't go over your monthly alotted monies. There is a hiearchy in which I test me direct marketing campaigns, but I usually start with PPC. - by cs_obd
As an internet Direct Marketer, I use Google Adwords to test my ad copy and split test the ads to find an the "sweet spot" in my ad campaign.

From that targeted referral, I make sure that the link goes to a specific landing page that is tailored to that visitors "worldview" and create the copy for that landing page (I also split test this).

With the tracking software and systematic monitoring, I don't have to guess which copy is better... the data tells me :)

You can set your budget on Google so you don't go over your monthly alotted monies. There is a hiearchy in which I test me direct marketing campaigns, but I usually start with PPC.
I love the precision of this, cd_obd. I might like to try this sometime as I have an alternate marketing plan that tries to pull clients off the net, but have not had much success with it and cannot afford excessive experimentation at this time.

If you don't mind me asking, how big of a budget do you use for this (or in my case, how SMALL of a budget can be used for this?) - by RainMaker
Hi Rainmaker,

Online Direct marketing is a superior way to test your ads.

Research keywords that relate to the products or services that you have on your site. Then create an adwords campaign using those keywords.

Also, when creating the campaign, you want to always have 2 ADs that are equally served on the Google Engine. Depending on the responses you get, and the data you view from the CTR (click through rate), you will be able to estimate which of the two ads is popular and relavant.

Upon deleting the Ad which was "underperforming" and creating another Ad to compete with you exsisting one, you are constantly playing "beat the control."

By continuously playing the "beat the control" game, you will see your CTR increase. Google rewards Marketer's with high CTR by having you pay less for a certain position.

Depending on your keyword research, if you so happen to stumble over a keyword that your visitors are searching for, and doesn't have too much competition, then there is a chance you will only pay $.05 per click :cool:

Now driving traffic to your site is only part of the conversion game. You also need conduct split testing on your Landing page. You may also use multivariate testing. By monitoring the effectiveness of your Copy through split testing, you will find which Copy works better for your targeted audience.

Through tracking your visitors from Google all the way to your optin, sales, or lead generation page, you will have the information to make good decisions on your marketing campaigns.

Hope that helps :)

Best,

Ritchie - by cs_obd
CS, I love the beautiful methodogy of this approach. It reminds me of solving a math equation. If you don't mind me asking, is this your primary source for new business? Do you find it challenging to covert this traffic to paying customers, and if not, how have you overcome that resistance? I love hearing specifics from people who do not talk about theory, but real life success. For the record, I am asking because I have not overcome these challenges successfully. - by RainMaker
Hi RainMaker,

Actually, driving traffic to several websites, I use a combination of tactics. In regards to PPC, the traffic generated is very specific to what I want to accomplish (ie. collect data, gather market worldviews, test AD copy, etc), and not for casual viewing.

Talking about converting visitors to paying customers is a new thread in itself :) So in short, before any monetary transactions are made, I would have already tested the copy, tested the Google Adwords Campaign, found the keywords that people are using to search for my product(service), and developed a marketing plan that answers the questions gathered from my previous campaign.

So, if we're talking about converting traffic, I have already used the data to tell me if there was a market in the first place. As a direct marketer, I make sure there is a market that wants the product, and then I develop the product. So, no problems converting traffic :)

When I think of resistance, specifically to the product, I think "FANTASTIC!" Once I know that my product (service) generates resistance, it tells me that my product is "shooting for the edges." WHICH I WANT.

From there, it's a matter of finding the people (early adopters), who want the product, are enthusiastic about the product, and cater to them. These early adopters are the key to my marketing strategy.

Sorry, more theory this time than tactics. :D - by cs_obd

When I think of resistance, specifically to the product, I think "FANTASTIC!" Once I know that my product (service) generates resistance, it tells me that my product is "shooting for the edges." WHICH I WANT.

From there, it's a matter of finding the people (early adopters), who want the product, are enthusiastic about the product, and cater to them. These early adopters are the key to my marketing strategy.
Can you clarify the term "shooting for the edges" for me. I am not familiar with it. How do you acertain the reasons behind the resistance? Are you in communication with these resisters and they are telling you "no" OR are they resisting by simply not converting and fading away?

Are the "early adopters" your most highly targeted market? What I mean by that is are these the creme de la creme of your prospects--the most likely to buy? - by RainMaker
The step to an effective direct marketing campaign are:
1. Define your budget what you can afford to spend for every dollar of sales obtained.
2. Research the various media and their effectiveness ain delivering responses for prodcuts or dervices like you own. There are always dream stories about great successes. but if you resech is good, you willbe able to get the model response rate...ahat an average effort will achieve.
3. This is the basic information that you need to select the media or in most cases the media mix.
4. We of course hope to beat the average by as large a margin as possible, but in planning we always need to have relaistic benchmarks.
5. To beat the average, we need to look for media with "big" upside potentials. its like playing with hedge funds in investing. E mail marketing with a microsite or landing page has one of the greatest upside potentials....its low cost and if it virals, WOW. - by alexhar
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