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Traditional Sales Training - Talking Points and Motives

In some traditional sales training a salesman in preparation for constructing sales arguments was instructed to ascertain the various "Talking Points" and "Buying Motives" to which appeals could be made. Is this still good advice? - by Community Mailbox
In some traditional sales training a salesman in preparation for constructing sales arguments was instructed to ascertain the various "Talking Points" and "Buying Motives" to which appeals could be made. Is this still good advice?
Very much so. The process becomes even stronger when you ascertain the possible or predictable areas of resistance. - by Ace Coldiron
Absolutely. This type of preparation gives you some structure in your conversation - it's important to think about what you want to say before you begin speaking!

It's also important to mention that you don't need to raise all the same talking points with every prospect and also that not all prospects will have the same "buying motives" or "pain points." Each account and each prospect is different.

How do you find out what to raise and what not to? By asking good, open ended questions that get them talking to you about their business and their needs. Once you get the appropriate information, you can tailor what you share.

Stephen - by sfrenkel
In some traditional sales training a salesman in preparation for constructing sales arguments was instructed to ascertain the various "Talking Points" and "Buying Motives" to which appeals could be made. Is this still good advice?
In my view - yes and no.

The idea of pre-thinking constructive things to talk about and trying to understand thebuying motives of your potential client is still very, very valid.

But the idea of using them as some sort of targets to which "appeals" can be made doesn't gel with me. Sounds very much like a "legal" model of selling where you argue and appeal your way to victory. But I may be misinterpreting the language.

Ian - by ianbrodie
In some traditional sales training a salesman in preparation for constructing sales arguments was instructed to ascertain the various "Talking Points" and "Buying Motives" to which appeals could be made. Is this still good advice?
I believe in preparation so thinking about what motivates people to buy at all and why people buy what they do sounds like good advice to me. - by Jeff Blackwell
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