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Customer Understanding

In the qualifying or disqualifying area I know we usually look for money, authority, and when the decision will be made.

In the customer understanding area what do you usually look for? - by realtor
In the qualifying or disqualifying area I know we usually look for money, authority, and when the decision will be made.

In the customer understanding area what do you usually look for?
A great question, Realtor.

David Cowper, a phenomenally successful insurance guy in Toronto, expressed as one of his five qualifiers: Do they understand their need?

I adopted it successfully several years ago along with his other recommendations on qualifying. - by Ace Coldiron
realtor, please describe "the customer understanding area"...

Thanks! - by Skip Anderson
The best is to identify the value that you are providing to the customer. Do they understand it and have you recieved conceptual agreement.

Drew Stevens - by Drew Stevens
realtor, please describe "the customer understanding area"...

Thanks!
After thinking more about it "customer understanding" isn't accurate but "Understanding the Customer" is. Sorry about that.

I know I want to find out;
  1. What's important to the customer?
  2. What does the customer hope to gain from meeting with you?
  3. What prompted the customer to consider a change?
What else do you normally look for? - by realtor
After thinking more about it "customer understanding" isn't accurate but "Understanding the Customer" is. Sorry about that.

I know I want to find out;
  1. What's important to the customer?
  2. What does the customer hope to gain from meeting with you?
  3. What prompted the customer to consider a change?
What else do you normally look for?
There is a fundamental difference between understanding the customer and qualifying the customer. The former requires knowing that person more as a person. The latter requires knowing the person more as a buyer. Both can be part of selling. The very best concentrate on both areas.

Which is it that you want to do? - by Ace Coldiron
There is a fundamental difference between understanding the customer and qualifying the customer. The former requires knowing that person more as a person. The latter requires knowing the person more as a buyer. Both can be part of selling. The very best concentrate on both areas.

Which is it that you want to do?
I am asking about understanding the customer.

I know that I am suppose to ask about money, authority and decision time when qualifying and I would like to know what I am suppose to ask to understand the customer.

I came up with these questions but did not know what everyone else usually asks or looks for.
  1. What's important to the customer?
  2. What does the customer hope to gain from meeting with you?
  3. What prompted the customer to consider a change?
- by realtor
I am asking about understanding the customer.

I know that I am suppose to ask about money, authority and decision time when qualifying and I would like to know what I am suppose to ask to understand the customer.

I came up with these questions but did not know what everyone else usually asks or looks for.
  1. What's important to the customer?
  2. What does the customer hope to gain from meeting with you?
  3. What prompted the customer to consider a change?
Realtor, I checked your profile and you rate yourself as novice. But your original question, and your subsequent clarifications are those that an "advanced" person would entertain. Either you underrate yourself or you have some natural gifts that can take you far in selling. So I'll give you my two cents towards your clarified question with full expectations that others will disagree.

Here goes. Just as there is a difference between understanding the buyer and understanding the customer (the person), there is a difference between Interview and Conversation. This is what so many salespeople never seem to embrace--for lack of either ability, or understanding. Interview questions can be planned and strategized and they are important as we know. Conversation on the other hand flows and grows and it cannot develop fully from an abitrarily chosen methodology. Selling methodologies are by nature artificial. Relating, and getting to know the other person, building openness, trust, and respect cannot come from the artificial constructs that we must use in a fact-finding interview. Dale Carnegie said show a sincere interest in the other person. If it's sincere, as he said, it cannot be faked. His message I think was Be Interested.

This has been my experience. With the sincere interest, the conversation will grow as will your own knowledge of the customer. - by Ace Coldiron
Realtor, I checked your profile and you rate yourself as novice. But your original question, and your subsequent clarifications are those that an "advanced" person would entertain. Either you underrate yourself or you have some natural gifts that can take you far in selling. So I'll give you my two cents towards your clarified question with full expectations that others will disagree.
Thank you Ace. I am here to learn. I have a long way to go but I know I am further along today than when I first started. thmbp2;

Interview questions can be planned and strategized and they are important as we know. Conversation on the other hand flows and grows and it cannot develop fully from an abitrarily chosen methodology.
Selling methodologies are by nature artificial. Relating, and getting to know the other person, building openness, trust, and respect cannot come from the artificial constructs that we must use in a fact-finding interview.
I can see what you mean.

Besides 'being interested' how do you build openness, trust and respect and what does 'respect' mean? - by realtor
Realtor,

You earn respect by treating people with respect, and as Ace mentioned, "Be interested."

You already know the questions you need to ask because you mentioned them in this post. Your objective is put aside your self-interest in closing a deal and concentrate on helping your potential customer find the EXACT home for their particular needs and situation.

Invest more time at the front-end of the sales conversation learning about your prospect's desires, wants and needs in a home. Probe to find out