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How many here do B2B tech sales? How Technical do you get?

B2B technology sales can often be complex because customers often need large integrated solutions to their technology problems.

How many do these kind of complex B2B sales? And how technical do you usually get with your customers?

Personally I just founded a computer game outsourcing company and most of my sales are for large technical solutions. So I spend a lot of time finding out all of their tech needs & I constantly have to use my technology to propose solutions. I just want to see who else has similar experiences in their jobs.

P.S. I'm also trying to build a good sales team for a big sales effort. There's a lot in it for someone who can help us, so feel free to PM me if interested. - by Gamer Mike
Mike

How technical one gets depends upon what you are trying accomplish.

Facts tell and stories sell!

If you are selling the technical nature of your product, the features, you have to get technical, especially when driving home your differentiated competitive advantages; however, "facts tell..."

In selling, FACTS always bring up an objection from the audience. "Don't need that," "It won't work here," 'Too cheap (or expensive)," etc. These types of technical discussions should only be used to PROVE your product can do what you say.

The secret of selling is telling a story that sells! Only a techie will understand how your product works and they typically don't have the horsepower to sign a contract. Give the techie's the FACTS but tell the executives a STORY.

The story is based around after they start using your product; their business drives, initiatives and operational issues will become so much easier. Always remember, there are only three ways you can help an executive:

1. Increase top-line revenue$
2. Increase operational efficiencies
3. Get closer to their clients, customers, partners, suppliers, competitors, etc.

First of all, the 3 factors don't fit at the technical level for these are BUSINESS issues NOT technical BS. It's a waste of time to be technical until late in the engagement.

If your product isn't answering at least one of the above; don't even make the call for you are NOT helping an executive succeed. You can't talk technical to an executive; their eyes will glaze over and you'll be sent down to the technical people. However, if you can relate to what an executive is potentially experiencing and your product can help solve that problem; they will spend hours with you!

You can go down the product path or a solutions path. An executive buys a vision of a solution and the pay for your product after you prove it to them!

Hope that helps!

Rollie
Helping you help others...
- by rolliemerrick
Rollie, I like your post. Excellent insight. Yes--stories sell. - by Ace Coldiron
Personally I just founded a computer game outsourcing company and most of my sales are for large technical solutions. So I spend a lot of time finding out all of their tech needs & I constantly have to use my technology to propose solutions. I just want to see who else has similar experiences in their jobs.

P.S. I'm also trying to build a good sales team for a big sales effort. There's a lot in it for someone who can help us, so feel free to PM me if interested.
We use an expression in our sales training environment of "Selling is not telling"; meaning too much information isn't going to get the deal signed.

But telling a story that exemplifies the solution you will eventually deliver and HOW it solved a similar problem in another company will.

In this way to can statisfy the belief that you product/technical solution has the ability to do what the prospect wants, without divulging the 'nitty gritty' too early. The technical items will of course have to be part of the presentation, but the sale is has been often closed by then, and you are just reinforcing 'how the solution you are bringing to them will be delivered'.

Instead of Qualify, Present and Close (coupled with Handling Stalls and Objections or Prospect Resistance) ....it can then become Qualify, Close, Present.

The other issue is highering people who can sell; technical people tend to do to much 'Free Consulting' in hopes of getting the business by 'wowwing people with their technical knowledge'.

We often help companies hire effective sales people in a technical environment. - by Paulette Halpern
I am in tech sales and luckily I have a sales engineer that answers all the tech questions. My company prefers to hire talented sales reps and then train or bring in a tech expert in the cycle if needed. - by b2brep
What is a B2B sale? - by rattus58
B2B technology sales can often be complex because customers often need large integrated solutions to their technology problems.

How many do these kind of complex B2B sales? And how technical do you usually get with your customers?

Personally I just founded a computer game outsourcing company and most of my sales are for large technical solutions. So I spend a lot of time finding out all of their tech needs & I constantly have to use my technology to propose solutions. I just want to see who else has similar experiences in their jobs.

P.S. I'm also trying to build a good sales team for a big sales effort. There's a lot in it for someone who can help us, so feel free to PM me if interested.
I do B2B television advertising sales which, believe it or not can get unbelievably technical just in a different way.

MP - by MPrince
B2B is selling to businesses, vs consumers, which is B2C.

I sell document management software B2B and have to be careful to tailor my communication based on the audience.

Certainly, as has been stated, C-level folk don't care so much about technical bells and whistles, except perhaps the CIO.

I find it best to know how the technical ties into the operational to cover all bases. - by klozer
Believe me, B2B tech products sell much better without stories, as far as I've seen. It's easier to give tech info than convert them to stories. Only give the tech info in small measured and graded doses over time, thru newsletters.

Of course, case studies are different, and they would help, but they are not stories.

Ganesan. - by ezynes
I also beleive that you have to judge from you client just how technical to be. Each call and each sale will be different as each client is different. Some will love the tech talk while some will have no idea what you are talking about. You as a sales person must have the insight to be able to see what you are looking for in your client. - by MPrince
B2B technology sales can often be complex because customers often need large integrated solutions to their technology problems.

How many do these kind of complex B2B sales? And how technical do you usually get with your customers?
The more you understand what it is you do, the easier it is to explain it in laymen terms; wouldn't you agree?
People in general, hate 2 things.. to be talked down to and, to feel stupid.
The best technical people I've ever dealt with for Anything Hi-tech knew so much about their profession, they could throw out all the hi-tech jargon and speak to me on a level I understood.
- I suggest drilling down until you are talking to the right person who is on the same level as what you are talking about.
You are the expert... use the KISS strategy. - by Ima Caller
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