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Is it possible to not negotiate?

I've had sales (cars) where the customer absolutely had to have what I was selling, he came to the lot with his mind already made up that he was buying, and that was it. There was no negotiating, just doing the paperwork. Is it possible to do this with more customers, in other words, get them so worked up for the product that the negotiating phase is minimal? - by wesbound
The time you spend negotiating is inversely proportional to the time you spend presenting and building value to your product. Layman's terms.. Lets Isolate the presentation step and the negotiation step from the rest of the sales process and say that those two steps take up 100% of the time. If you spend 75% of your time building value and presenting the F.A.B. of the vehicle than you will only spend the other 25% negotiating. Now if you only spend 25% of the time presenting and building value then your going to spend 75% of the time negotiating price, and you will lose ALOT if not all of your gross. I do automotive sales, and about 90% of the time I have them closed by the second pencil. I also maintain a majority of my gross. So the easy way to reduce the negotiation phase to a minimal is to build VALUE into the car. If its a $20,000 car then give them a $40,000 walkaround on it. - by jrboyd
Jr, thank you so much. Could you give me some examples of things you say/do during your walk around. I do spend a lot of time with them and show them everything about the car, but I must be doing it wrong because I'm still not getting them juiced up enough. - by wesbound
First and foremost you have to figure out what their buying points are. For cars its usually broken down into these 6:

Safety
Performance
Appearance
Comfort
Economical
Dependability

Usually it will fall into a couple of these catagories. When you find out which of them they fall in then you base 90% of your Feature advantage benifit presentation on these buying points. - by jrboyd
I always ask the question, "what's important to you in a new car?" I don't always get the information I'm looking for. Do you have any better ways to accomplish this task? - by wesbound
A bunch of it is done in the customer interview and common sense. If you see that the customer has a family, then you might lead with "As a family man/woman, I take it that safety is important to you, right?" OR just ask, "Mr. Customer off the following which would you rate as being the most important feature of a car, Safety, Performance, Comfort or Economical?" You usually can leave appearance and dependability out because people will not buy an ugly car, and people will not buy a car that is in the shop every other week. - by jrboyd
Can you recommend any books/videos/other resources to become the very best possible car salesman? - by wesbound
I'll email you a basic guide. Message me your email address if you want because the word limitation doesnt allow me to send via Salespractice - by jrboyd
You usually can leave appearance and dependability out because people will not buy an ugly car, and people will not buy a car that is in the shop every other week.
Wesbound, this is in response to you, but I have quoted another member above.

Learn the fundamentals. That is how you start on the road to being the best. A few years ago when I was available for, and had an interest in, sales training, a prominant sales trainer specializing in the automobile industry hired me to coach him in a "coach the coach" effort. Later I designed a sales concept for auto dealers who were not satisfied with GMs training on leasing automobiles (GMAC called it The A-B Comparison). I know my share of the top pros in that industry, and often compared notes.

On this thread you read the following regarding selling points:

Safety
Performance

Appearance
Comfort
Economical
Dependability

GMs basic training used the acronym SPACED to make it easy to remember.

I strongly recommend that you develop the habit early in your career to NEVER skip over any buying points on any assumption that they don't need to be covered. I'll repeat that: NEVER!

Learn to start doing it right now, and you will avoid being stuck forever below the level you want to attain. - by Ace Co