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Cold calling and No Soliciting signs

What is the recommended course of action when you're cold calling and you come across a No Soliciting sign? - by Community Mailbox
Depends.....

My first sales job was as a financial advisor. The job involved wandering door to door... business to business.... prospecting for new clients. On one day I came to the State Office of a Fraternal Organization. On the door was posted a No Soliciting sign. I went in because I was curious about how the organization differed from the Fraternal organization I belonged to.

In the process of learning about the organization, I noticed a bunch of investment books on the shelf. I started to ask questions about the books and their use.

After about an hour of chatting, I walked out with over $300,000 to invest on behalf of the organization.

In my experience, if you feel sales is something you DO TO people rather than DO FOR people, you should just walk past places posted with No Soliciting signs. Otherwise, stop in and get to know some folks. You never know how it will turn out.

Jerry - by jdedwa11
I find that soliciting and asking questions are two different actions. I've been in food sales and almost every restaurant has a "No Soliciting" sign on the door, I find this to imply they don't want traveling briefcase-watch salesmen selling their customers watches at the table.

I would ask to speak to the manager or owner and ask them a question: May I make an appointment to discuss potential foodcost savings with my company? atempting to sell right out of the chute as opposed to having an appointment.

I am currently in the Uniform and linnen industry. I find No Soliciting signs on every major company I cold call on. Again I simply ask for the Manager that handles their needs and make an appointment. - by chrisr110465
In my experience, if you feel sales is something you DO TO people rather than DO FOR people, you should just walk past places posted with No Soliciting signs. Otherwise, stop in and get to know some folks. You never know how it will turn out.
Oh man, Bravo!

I find that soliciting and asking questions are two different actions. I've been in food sales and almost every restaurant has a "No Soliciting" sign on the door, I find this to imply they don't want traveling briefcase-watch salesmen selling their customers watches at the table.
That's one way to look at it and by those rules a true sales pro has nothing to worry about from no soliciting signs.

Occasionally I run into a "No Agents" sign which is about the same as "No Soliciting". I still cold call using the same script with the exception that I add, "I saw your sign and the part about no agents...." and then go right into my original script (Thank You Jerry Bresser for the script!) thmbp2; - by Houston
What is the recommended course of action when you're cold calling and you come across a No Soliciting sign?

I went through 30 years of door-door cold calling and developed a system regarding signs.

1 Many office doors are originally installed with no soliciting signs. I discovered that most of these tenants forget they even had one. So I ignore those that look as old as the building.

2 I also look at the complex and if they all have them again, I ignore them.

3 If none of the office doors have them but one, I look to see how aged it is and determine from there. (Is it new?) If it is, he or she has the sign there just for you and is waiting to make you look foolish by you ignoring it.

4 If a sign looks fresh or hand made--I never go in. There are way too many fish to fry--I don't need the aggravation.
Also, what good is an upset prospect. That is very hard to overcome.

5 Finally, a sign posted on the inside of the window is also a no-no.

Why? Because I went through a door that had a hand made "No Soliciting" sign. The owner screamed many 4 letter words in my direction, grabbed my sales brochure out of my hand, and proceeded to call the police.

On what grounds could he call the police you wonder? Many counties and cities have "Green River" laws and I could have been cited for soliciting without a license. I promptly departed.

Nevertheless, he called our office, talked to the owner for some time in the hopes of getting me fired. While that did not happen, we were now on notice and had to apply for a license the next time we visited that nice little town. It was very frustrating as the company had worked that town for 38 years without a license. It was a lot of paper work and permit fees just to pay a few hundred dollars.

The dec