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Does Marketing Mean Sales?

I know we tend to put Marketing and Sales together as if they mean the same thing but in fact they are quite different. I believe understanding the difference between them is very important. The two are related but the difference is this; Marketing raises awareness and helps to create a relationship between a business and a customer but it is Sales that makes the cash register ring or causes cash flow? What is your opinion?

MPrince - by MPrince
I mostly agree, MP, assuming you're talking about traditional B2B selling scenarios. Online marketing is a different matter, however. - by Skip Anderson
I'm in agreement.

One comment: If online marketing is a form of advertising, then I would view it as sales. I think--not sure--Skip's post suggests that. This could make for interesting discussion. "Marketing" is a word that has become diluted in meaning because of its overuse today. - by Ace Coldiron
I'm in agreement.

One comment: If online marketing is a form of advertising, then I would view it as sales. I think--not sure--Skip's post suggests that. This could make for interesting discussion. "Marketing" is a word that has become diluted in meaning because of its overuse today.
I agree that the word Marketing has become to "used" and that is my reason in starting this thread. I would like to hear your professional opinions; I too believe it would make some interesting conversation.

I also want to hear more from Skip about online Marketing I must admit I need more education there and it seems he is just the man to talk about it.

I looked Marketing and Sales in the American Heritage Dictionary I was very interested to see what the dictionary had to say about the two; in short below are the definitions.

Marketing; The act or business of promoting sales of a product.
Sales; The exchange of goods for an amount of money.

MPrince - by MPrince

Marketing; The act or business of promoting sales of a product.
Sales; The exchange of goods for an amount of money.
In common, perhaps incorrect, usage "sales" interchanges with the word "selling". Certainly, it is most often used here in that way by the developer and participants of the site.

"Marketing" is very gray today in conversation. Ogilvy defined it as "objectivity" for his purposes. - by Ace Coldiron
In common, perhaps incorrect, usage "sales" interchanges with the word "selling". Certainly, it is most often used here in that way by the developer and participants of the site.

"Marketing" is very gray today in conversation. Ogilvy defined it as "objectivity" for his purposes.

You are correct I believe...Sell or selling is an act to achieve a certain price or dollar amount for a product or service.

Salesperson would be a noun and Sales is a profession and I suppose it would also be a noun in my opinion.

The only way I know how to explain Marketing is; Marketing is positioning of your product or service.

MP - by MPrince
The only way I know how to explain Marketing is; Marketing is positioning of your product or service.
...which brings up an interesting question. Can a business position itself, or can positioning ultimately only be created by the market? Don't jump at an answer to that one. Think of the lessons of Coca Cola and Avis. Or Edsel!! - by Ace Coldiron
...which brings up an interesting question. Can a business position itself, or can positioning ultimately only be created by the market? Don't jump at an answer to that one. Think of the lessons of Coca Cola and Avis. Or Edsel!!

You are right...this is one I am going to have to think about. I will give it some careful thought and give you my thoughts later. - by MPrince
Well Ace...I have to say that a business can in fact position itself but the market will ultimately determine the positioning or I should say success or failure of the product. Coca Cola has definitely positioned itself as the soft drink leader so that we even call a soft drink a "coke". That does not mean all the product launches Coca Cola tries will make it. The same is true with the Edsel, I believe. So...yes a business can position itself but the market positions the product. - by MPrince
Well Ace...I have to say that a business can in fact position itself but the market will ultimately determine the positioning or I should say success or failure of the product. Coca Cola has definitely positioned itself as the soft drink leader so that we even call a soft drink a "coke". That does not mean all the product launches Coca Cola tries will make it. The same is true with the Edsel, I believe. So...yes a business can position itself but the market positions the product.
I have to agree with that.

Notice also that businesses that position themselves often do it by effecting the face of distribution. Think Walmart.

Coke has some of the greatest brand name recognition on the planet. In the area I live in, Pepsi dominates the market and has for years. In any restaurant here, you are much more likely to be served Pepsi, and most customers ask for Coke, probably because that name is so entrenched in their minds. As a result, servers are conditioned to ask "Pepsi OK?" to the point of it being a mantra. I've seen people ask for "cola". They still invariably respond "Pepsi OK?".

In the above example, the reason Pepsi dominates locally in sales is because of a very strong and