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Something to "Think Over"

In an article that appeared on SalesPractice today, the author wrote:

If you like to think things over, you will be vulnerable to letting prospects do the same thing. Thinking it over is not part of an “effective selling” strategy.

What is your opinion of that statement? - by Ace Coldiron
I must find the article I just read and it was right on as far as I am concerned. The title. Stop selling the way you buy.So many sales technicians sell the way they buy andthis could be a small percentage of clients that buy the way you buy. Be prepared to have the ownership exchange enjoyed by your clients via a varity of ways.

You play the way you practice. - by rich34232
Greetings from Maui.

In all fairness, I wanted to make sure I was not drawing that statement out of context to make my comments. I read the article several times. It is certainly not my intent to demean the author. We are all guilty of flawed statements, and we can learn from those of ourselves and others'.

The statement struck me as flawed in any context I could filter it through.

There are a lot of people on this forum, lurkers included, who categorize themselves as intermediate. Some of you may want to take the time, on my suggestion, to think about the author's words above and find the flaws. Not easy--I know. But if you can do it, you have a good chance for taking a quantum leap into advanced territory---and staying there. - by Ace Coldiron
What is "effective selling"? Does that mean selling that produces a sale? Does "thinking it over" mean the prospect leaves to figure out the buying decision alone? - by Seth
In an article that appeared on SalesPractice today, the author wrote:

If you like to think things over, you will be vulnerable to letting prospects do the same thing. Thinking it over is not part of an “effective selling” strategy.

What is your opinion of that statement?
It is true to a large extent. If a person is the kind of individual that goes through a long "thinking process' of their own to come to a decision, he is likely to be 'sympathetic' to the prospect that 'wants to do the same thing"....as if an internal voice inside the sales person is saying....'sure if that were me, I would take my time to 'think it over''.

Decision makers/influencers are more 'naturally comfortable' in getting others to make decisions. But others can learn how to do it as well.... - by Paulette Halpern
It is true to a large extent. If a person is the kind of individual that goes through a long "thinking process' of their own to come to a decision, he is likely to be 'sympathetic' to the prospect that 'wants to do the same thing"....as if an internal voice inside the sales person is saying....'sure if that were me, I would take my time to 'think it over''.
I have never seen conclusive evidence that people sell the way they buy. I've dealt with enough medical doctors as clients to know they love to negotiate price. Try negotiating a surgical procedure with one of them sometime.

I am a process-driven consumer myself--to a fault. I am not more "sympathetic" towards other process-driven buyers over task-driven buyers.

You teach Sandler's work. His selling process would attempt to neutralize either extreme. He would interrupt the buying process in doing so, and do it effectively. - by Ace Coldiron
I have never seen conclusive evidence that people sell the way they buy. I've dealt with enough medical doctors as clients to know they love to negotiate price. Try negotiating a surgical procedure with one of them sometime.

I am a process-driven consumer myself--to a fault. I am not more "sympathetic" towards other process-driven buyers over task-driven buyers.

You teach Sandler's work. His selling process would attempt to neutralize either extreme. He would interrupt the buying process in doing so, and do it effectively.
I am a practitioner in training the Sandler process. Learning how to overcome accepting "Think It Overs" as an acceptable 'decision' is part of what we train...and our clients themselves admit, that they have empathy with the person who is saying it....and learning how to overcome that empathy started out by 'examining' just how those people buy.

The Sandler methodology is heavily rooted in psychology, that has been developed through the help of professionals and supported in the field by our clients.

By the way, I did negotiate with a surgeon the fee he charged for my sons spinal surgery.....using Sandler methodology. - by Paulette Halpern
By the way, I did negotiate with a surgeon the fee he charged for my sons spinal surgery.....using Sandler methodology.
I don't understand that example, except that you might be trying to override my observations in dealing with hundreds of medical practitioners for the sake of supporting your opinion.

I brought up Sandler because I admire his work. We can mention the "what" of his results forever, but that is not instructive because it does not provide the "how".

Sandler was a student of human behavour. He based his methods on his observations. UNLIKE, what the author of the topic's statement recommended, Sandler was a deep thinker in that regard. He did think things over, or else he could never have devised his methodology. Sandler listened, thought, and acted. He acted in a way to neutralize the prospect's stance, because he was scientist enough to know that people will act favorably from a neutral position, not from an extreme one. He taught never to assume that a sale was easy even if the prospect was "coming your way."

Sandler was a thinker. Every high achieving salesperson I have ever known THOUGHT themselves through selling situations, using the tools that they had learned or developed. - by Ace Coldiron
I don't understand that example, except that you might be trying to override my observations in dealing with hundreds of medical practitioners for the sake of supporting your opinion.

I brought up Sandler because I admire his work. We can mention the "what" of his results forever, but that is not instructive because it does not provide the "how".

Sandler was a student of human behavour. He based his methods on his observations. UNLIKE, what the author of the topic's statement recommended, Sandler was a deep thinker in that regard. He did think things over, or else he could never have devised his methodology. Sandler listened, thought, and acted. He acted in a way to neutralize the prospect's stance, because he was scientist enough to know that people will act favorably from a neutral position, not from an extreme one. He taught never to assume that a sale was easy even if the prospect was "coming your way."

Sandler was a thinker. Every high achieving salesperson I have ever known THOUGHT themselves through selling situations, using the tools that they had learned or developed.
Some sales people 'over think' themselves out of a sale....they overanalyze, rather than question effectively the prospect to help the prospect move to a position where he believes he needs the product or service to solve a problem he has at a price he is willing to pay and decide to do it. - by Paulette Halpern
In an article that appeared on SalesPractice today, the author wrote:

If you like to think things over, you will be vulnerable to letting prospects do the same thing. Thinking it over is not part of an “effective selling” strategy.

What is your opinion of that statement?
I have to disagree with this statement...in my opinion you don't force a prospect into anything he does or does not want to do. You can make suggestion but the prospect makes the decision whether or not to think it over. However I can only speak for myself and the type of sales I am in. I sale an intangible and sometimes a very big ticket product and in twenty plus years of selling this product have I never seen someone make a decision to buy on the first or even the second call. It will take three to five calls before the deal is closed and it starts with the statement,"I want to think it over."

MP - by MPrince
In an article that appeared on SalesPractice today, the author wrote:

If you like to think things over, you will be vulnerable to letting prospects do the same thing. Thinking it over is not part of an “effective selling” strategy.

What is your opinion of that statement?
In a word... huh? :cu

I'm not sure I understand the relevance between the insecurities of the client and the overthinking of a purchase by my wife... or myself for that matter, not that I think much before buying something... much prefering to impulse and deal with the consequenses later if necessary... but that is me...

I've heard that wanting to think it over means the client doesn't have enough information to go ahead with the sale. That's probably part of it. It also might mean he needs to consult with the missus or the hisselfs about it too, especially if it means money from a joint checking account... in which case you should be talking to both of them instead of just him or her.

When someone tells me that they want to think it over, it means my planning sucked, not that I was thinking too much... more likely I wasn't thinking at all. I'm thinking anyways that mostly one should know whether you have given the client enough information before you attempt to "take care of the details" for them.

Aloha..... shds; - by rattus58
I have to disagree with this statement...in my opinion you don't force a prospect into anything he does or does not want to do. You can make suggestion but the prospect makes the decision whether or not to think it over. However I can only speak for myself and the type of sales I am in. I sale an intangible and sometimes a very big ticket product and in twenty plus years of selling this product have I never seen someone make a decision to buy on the first or even the second call. It will take three to five calls before the deal is closed and it starts with the statement,"I want to think it over."

MP
Long or short sales cycle; multiple call sale cycle -- accepting 'think it overs' become unproductive. It is not a matter of forcing a prospect into turning his 'think it over' into a YES or no, it is concepts and strategies to uncover what is behind the 'think it over', combined with processes that go on, before the day of presentation to 'minimize' it happening. - by Paulette Halpern
Long or short sales cycle; multiple call sale cycle -- accepting 'think it overs' become unproductive. It is not a matter of forcing a prospect into turning his 'think it over' into a YES or no, it is concepts and strategies to uncover what is behind the 'think it over', combined with processes that go on, before the day of presentation to 'minimize' it happening.
It would be instructive to know what those concepts and strategies would be. And--how they could be executed without thinking.

I don't mean that in a sarcastic tone. But I am disagreeing with you on some points, and it's a good discussion.

It's also important at this point on the thread to differentiate between two categories of "think it over" prospects. First, the people who use "think it over" as a convenient smokescreen to hide their real objection. That has been covered many times on this forum. Second---at issue here--the PROCESS DRIVEN BUYER. - by Ace Coldiron
It would be instructive to know what those concepts and strategies would be. And--how they could be executed without thinking.

I don't mean that in a sarcastic tone. But I am disagreeing with you on some points, and it's a good discussion.

It's also important at this point on the thread to differentiate between two categories of "think it over" prospects. First, the people who use "think it over" as a convenient smokescreen to hide their real objection. That has been covered many times on this forum. Second---at issue here--the PROCESS DRIVEN BUYER.
Those concepts and strategies are what our clients hire us to help them learn and infuse into their conversations with their prospects as we coach them, so don't expect to see them written here.

No one is saying no one is 'thinking'. A presentation is a reaffirmation of what your company will do for a prospect to solve their problem and within the budget that has been established and made to people who are the decision makers. With those elements in place on presentation day, you should be able to get a decision as to what the 'next positive step will be to move forward' or the decision that they are 'not interested'; neither one of those is a "think it over' on presentation day. - by Paulette Halpern
Those concepts and strategies are what our clients hire us to help them learn and infuse into their conversations with their prospects as we coach them, so don't expect to see them written here.
Yes, I soon realized that. And I object to it. You've been designated a top sales expert here, and I would think that means something more than a license to advertise for free.

The thing is that I started this thread so that it could evolve into an instructive discussion, not as a place for teasers, i.e. send money--we'll teach you how. You're welcome to keep the good stuff under lock and key. There are people here, sales trainers among them, who are willing to show the How as well as mention the What. - by Ace Coldiron
Yes, I soon realized that. And I object to it. You've been designated a top sales expert here, and I would think that means something more than a license to advertise for free.

The thing is that I started this thread so that it could evolve into an instructive discussion, not as a place for teasers, i.e. send money--we'll teach you how. You're welcome to keep the good stuff under lock and key. There are people here, sales trainers among them, who are willing to show the How as well as mention the What.
I always am willing to share the overall concepts of what we are about. From that level, people can talk with me one on one and see if anything else fits. That still doesn't mean they become clients. But the nuts and bolts of the "how" are left for clients.

Your statement "You're welcome to keep the good stuff under lock and key." is perplexing....we don't have 'good stuff' vs 'bad stuff', its all good to us. I do separate it however in other ways, which you disagree with. - by Paulette Halpern
I have to disagree with this statement...in my opinion you don't force a prospect into anything he does or does not want to do. You can make suggestion but the prospect makes the decision whether or not to think it over. However I can only speak for myself and the type of sales I am in. I sale an intangible and sometimes a very big ticket product and in twenty plus years of selling this product have I never seen someone make a decision to buy on the first or even the second call. It will take three to five calls before the deal is closed and it starts with the statement,"I want to think it over."

MP
Certainly that is great example.

That is the process that I have begun to address. NOT ALL "thinking it over" is smokescreen. Evaluation on the part of the client/prospect can be real, and smart.

The key here, from an advanced perspective is fascinating, because there is a paradox involved.

A process-driven prospect (thinking it over) can be directed or guided by the salesperson towards a task that facilitates and expediates the buying process.

A task-driven prospect can be directed or guided by the salesperson towards a process that facilitates and expediates and ENSURES the buying process with the salesperson.

The latter case is often seen among the very best auto salespeople who make it a point to "slow the prospect down". They also know that "time binds".

In either case, for the salesperson to absolve him/herself of the "think it over" aspect, would be anti-strategic and poor selling.

That is a flaw that I inferred earlier. The other flaw is observable in this segment of the quote:
"Thinking it over is not part of an “effective selling” strategy."
Thinking it over is Assessment and Evaluation--two fundamental elements of "STRATEGY" of any sort. There is no exclusion for selling. - by Ace Coldiron
I don't understand that example, except that you might be trying to override my observations in dealing with hundreds of medical practitioners for the sake of supporting your opinion.
You wrote previously "Try negotiating a surgical procedure with one of them sometime."....so when I answered you very directly, that I did just that, you did not like that. - by Paulette Halpern
You wrote previously "Try negotiating a surgical procedure with one of them sometime."....so when I answered you very directly, that I did just that, you did not like that.
It was a figurative suggestion, and only that, used as an illustration of people not buying as they sell which is in line with the topic here. It was obviously not intended to draw forth experiences with doctors which would be an entirely new topic. As a father, and as a person that is under medical care myself, I was delighted that you successfully negotiated with a doctor. But analagous illustrations should not become the topic. Otherwise, analogies will become less welcome on SalesPractice and I'm sure nobody wants that because they are a good tool for communication. - by Ace Coldiron
You wrote previously "Try negotiating a surgical procedure with one of them sometime."....so when I answered you very directly, that I did just that, you did not like that.
Paulette, is the above response I wrote to MPrince's post in line, fundamentally, with concepts that Sandler taught? Or not? - by Ace Coldiron
Paulette, is the above response I wrote to MPrince's post in line, fundamentally, with concepts that Sandler taught? Or not?
We use stories to make a point in many situations. Stories make the illustrations easier for the buyer to accept, without having the salesperson look overly aggressive or pushy, yet can clearly make a point.

I don't know if that answers your question or not. - by Paulette Halpern
I have rethought my comments on this thread and I feel I owe Paulette an apology.

In my exuberance for this topic and its potential I got carried away and treated Paulette's posts unfairly. The fact is I have no right to expect her to reveal proprietary information or intellectual capital with regard to what she teaches on a public forum. Not only has she invested time, study, and money to earn the privilege of representing the Sandler organization, her licensee arrangementts might, rightly so, forbid her to share technique here.

I was wrong.

I hope this thread continues, and develops into an instructive one. BTW, I want to say that I endorse the program Paulette represents and have recommended it many times. It is strategically sound. - by Ace Coldiron
I have rethought my comments on this thread and I feel I owe Paulette an apology.

In my exuberance for this topic and its potential I got carried away and treated Paulette's posts unfairly. The fact is I have no right to expect her to reveal proprietary information or intellectual capital with regard to what she teaches on a public forum. Not only has she invested time, study, and money to earn the privilege of representing the Sandler organization, her licensee arrangementts might, rightly so, forbid her to share technique here.

I was wrong.

I hope this thread continues, and develops into an instructive one. BTW, I want to say that I endorse the program Paulette represents and have recommended it many times. It is strategically sound.
Thank you, its appreciated. And let the dialogue move on. - by Paulette Halpern
Sadly, story telling is mostly a lost art.

As for Sandler, PSS, Huthwaite, Carnegie, Richardson, Miller Heinman, Canadian Professional Sales Association, Direct Selling Association, Action Selling and many individuals & companies that hang their hat as expert trainers - none of us who are declare themselves as trainers in this forum should need to reference these, except in a way that is unbiased.

Why? Well ...

For one thing, not a one of the above does significant business ... at least not enough to declare they are truly standing out over all others. To me that means the sales industry is in a shambles ... because none of the sales trianing methodologies produced even one stand-out worldwide leader, if you get my drift!

Think on this. I have already.

If you need a tool to check it for yourself simply go to Hoovers.com and search "sales training" (with the quotes).

Even the company Hoovers recommends themselves - Miller Heinman - is clearly not a standout, though they think they have done a lot of sales research - this in accordance with their website. I wonder if they would be shocked to see what Huthwaite has done (not that I love this company either, I clearly don't).

So far I've made no comment as to whether or not the training is outstanding, for any of them. Just that if it was you would think that they would out sell the competition. capisce?

I never studied Sandler. If what is in this forum is accurate - like the comment where one out of ten cold calls produces a prospect - then I don't think they are experts on prospecting. But they very well may be excellent on other aspects of sales practices ... I can't say. I do know exactly how I stand on PAIN (which I wrote about 15+ years ago). I disagree with it - when it comes to either an expression of a need or converting or restating the need as pain ... this is simply not possible in all cases (yes, we can debate this any time any place).

One thing cannot be denied; in a world that sells trillions of $ a year, they do only 70 million in training. And this does not mean Paulette is not a great coach.

I am very much not to the liking of my own countries association. So it is not just Sandler, Huthwaite or any personal axe to grind on my part that leads me to say what I say. And, since I am not selling training there is no personal gain from me speaking my opinion in this or any thread, as I do not attempt to steal business (I will coach prospecting - occasionally. My clients end up getting coached most of the time but that is not my primary business).

I say all this because I would prefer to know what you think - who ever you are. Not what Sandler thinks. Not what Miller Heinman thinks, or what your grandmother thinks but what you ... you the reader and website contributor ... thinks.

If I was to coach any personal coach I would not suggest they align themselves with a sales school/methodology. Instead, I would recommend being an individual, while still being able to draw from all of the better ideas of sales as well as adding in my touches (in my case that is on prospecting). Why? Because there are either some really odd assumptions that simply do not make sense or weaknesses or both in every sales training group I have studied for the last 30 years (my own trainign in PSS was awesome but they were weak on prospecting, very weak!).

Even though Huthwaite says the AGE OF THE GURU is gone, they themselves are gurus (try searching at You Tube; Neil Rackham). And how can you trust a biased source?

That is why I began writing the book - which I am not sure I want to discuss here in terms of the title, it is not resolved. But will have a "consider the source" angle as part of the name. Because I think the sales training industry is in a very bad state indeed, maybe the worst it has been in since after the 2nd world war when Earl Nightingale took the bull by the reins!

We can't do away with the guru. The industry does need a sales Messiahs ... I have not seen any recently!

This forum for instance - we cannot even agree on what sales skills are called. Let alone get coaches to stop promoting this or that sales methodology ... !

Look at the people talkign about referrals as the openly way to go or direct marketing as the only method as "cold calling died" ... neither of these tidbits of advice are good. Simply because there are many reasons why walking in or picking up the phone works and why direct mail won't ... nor will referrals. At least not enough to stay busy.

If I was reading this, I would take "pieces of eight" ... to borrow the name form a rock album.

Want to learn to prospect? Listen to Peter Burke do his 3 hour seminar. Want to learn if a certain personality type is successful in sales - debunked by Huthwaite. Want to understand the basics? I can';t tell you where to go ... PSS was awesome in its day, not sure what it is now.

Watch out for NEW AGE ideas. As soon as they tell you "that does not work any more" start thinking "then it never did" and from there on out be wary. Because people have not changed much in our lifetimes. They "know more" ... what? Do you mean they "know less about more"?

Best of luck always. - by Gold Calling
Hopefully some day I can write a manual on sales that is meaningful and simply structured. I agree with you about the "human condition", that is, that we are pretty much the same people today as we were a million years ago... certainly thousands of years ago and sales were going on from the beginning.

The simple sale is "Do you want to buy this?".
The complex sale after all of the machinations still comes down to... Do you want to buy this now we've gone through the process.

I don't want to read, nor do I want my kids to read, a book on the psychology of selling. I want them to smile, be sincere, and take the first step. I want them to identify areas of weakness and strengthen them with our products.

In that sense, I want them to identify certain situations that I've run into over time, and have a heads up as to how to meet the challenge. Words are big in insurance sales... some should never be uttered, others should be used sparingly, and others should be used frequently... or at least their meaning should be.

Buy is a word that should be not used probably, at least that is what I've heard.. but then when we buy, we own, when we purchase we own, when we invest, we own... when we go ahead with this we own... conceptually... I don't use the word buy, but I do use other ownership or action words... often after having experimented with other flight techniques that left me smoldering in the sand...

When you want to think it over it means to me that you've not got the information to make a decision today. The goal is to see someone with the purpose of making a decision today, or if in a worksite situation, to give them the information they need to go home with and come back the next to make a decision. Do you have enough information... that would be both ways, as someone once earlier mentioned... know where your client is... yup.. thisis a fun business...

But let's have a simple sales book... my goal.... :)

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
This is a really interesting thread.
My thoughts are that if you are the sort of person that takes time to make buying decisions, then you 'naturally' will have bags of empathy, with someone who says 'I want to think about it'.
Similarly if you are someone who buys impulsively, then you would 'naturally' have less empathy.
What the experienced sales people do is adapt their behaviour and responses, to relate to the particular customer and situation.
So just because you are a tentative buyer doesn't necessarily mean that you will come across as a tentative seller. - by marky
This is a really interesting thread.
My thoughts are that if you are the sort of person that takes time to make buying decisions, then you 'naturally' will have bags of empathy, with someone who says 'I want to think about it'.
Similarly if you are someone who buys impulsively, then you would 'naturally' have less empathy.
What the experienced sales people do is adapt their behaviour and responses, to relate to the particular customer and situation.
So just because you are a tentative buyer doesn't necessarily mean that you will come across as a tentative seller.
In past surveys--I can't remember the exact sources--EMPATHY was listed very high among the traits of top sales performers.

Thanks for getting the thread back to its topic, marky. - by Ace Coldiron
What the experienced sales people do is adapt their behaviour and responses, to relate to the particular customer and situation.
So just because you are a tentative buyer doesn't necessarily mean that you will come across as a tentative seller.
Hey, look. I want to think it over is a relative simple masking of the fact that there is an issue that you did not deal with effectively or uncover ... you have to find out what is the stumbling block ... set up a series of closed probes, like this;

"Listen, I understand. This is an important decision, one you should think it over <this is empathizing - don 't pause here or you are done>... _________, I do this every day. Where as you make a decision like this ... what ... once every five years? I mean; with my vast experience I can help you with this complicated decision. Which part where you confused with or unsure about <for God's sake don't stop here - don't pause either> was it ____________________________?"

If the answer is NO keep going through every improtant element till you find out what the concern is.

The first blank might be filled with "... the price?"

Good luck and sorry Ace, not sure what caused me to rant on last night.

. - by Gold Calling
[quote=Gold Calling;38421]
I never studied Sandler. If what is in this forum is accurate - like the comment where one out of ten cold calls produces a prospect - then I don't think they are experts on prospecting.
quote]

The 9 out of 10 calls that did not move from 'suspect' to 'prospect' in the example shown, when through a process of the sytem that ended up with them being disqualified; If that one cold call then closed into business, that would then be a 100% close ration. Not bad. The purpose of prospecting or finding potential customers is to 'open opportunities where people see a mutually beneficial reason to do business with you'. Sandler training focuses a lot on 'disqualifying' prospects to weed out people that will only turn you into 'unpaid consultant'. Those disqualifying skills/techniques begin with the first encounter (cold call, walk in, networking introduction or even a client introduction).

I wouldn't want to identify 5 out of 10 suspects as 'prospects' and spend lots of time with them only to find days/weeks/months later that 4 of those 5 had no intention of doing business with me, anyway. In the end the same 1 out of 10 closed. So if it starts with 1 out of 10 and that 1 (in either case), becomes the revenue generating client so much the better. The time NOT wasted with the 4 who were not 'really qualified' opportunities, could have been spent doing either other revenue producing projects or searching out other prospects. - by Paulette Halpern
"removed at the contributor's request" - by Gold Calling
I have to say that I'm getting frustrated ffom my posts being erased and having to start over again....

But here is what I have to say... You're obviously the best there is at sales. It's obvious that you NEVER lose a sale and it's obvious that you are a MASTER of qualifying a prospect, unlike the rest of us who many times are just using a list a names that we've never seen before.

One in Nine you say sucks as a ratio. You're probably right about that, especially since it probably comes from a list of unknowns. I however, feel that if one can come to a ratio of 1-9 from a purchased list, such as directories USA and with no other research or qualifying come up with one in 9, means two appointments a day or morning. Let's see... using a rolling cycle that could mean as many as 20 face to face meeting appointments by the end of the third week and every week thereafter. Now let's see... can you do 20 face to face meetings in a week?

Let's see... in our world... unsophisticated though as it is compared to yours, that one in nine is research. It is qualifying the client and when you get the one on one... you've probably got a really hot prospect. Maybe not as hot as yours, but I'll bet that the effort to get that one in 9 pays off just as much as a one in three that you experts get every time you call.

Now, when you are calling for employee marketing appointments, that one in nine might actually net you a face to face with a companyfull of employees.. so I'm not at all knocking a 1-9 without knowing more detail about it personally.

You might think us all pretty pedestrian running around in your gold cadillac, but I think I'd like to be able to evaluate for myself an actual call (via a conference call and listening) before I'd be suggesting that anyone's one in nine is a failure... or in any way SUCKS. - by rattus58
I have to say that I'm getting frustrated ffom my posts being erased and having to start over again...
Please note: When composing lengthy posts such as Articles we recommend that you compose and save your message in a text editor such as Notepad/Wordpad first to prevent data loss in the event that your session expires prior to posting. - by Jeff Blackwell
Good point... I'll do that.. probably get my spelling right too.... :)

How do you get on or put someone on a buddy list?

Much Aloha,

Tom :cool: - by rattus58
I am not sure what you are asking from the people in this thread. I thought you wanted to know what we thought about your statement.
I think the person who said that uses sympathy not empathy and will lose more sales then they receive.
1. What exactly needs to be thought out? Most clients who are not called on the phone radomly already know about the product and the price they are willing to spend. Most even know how much more they are willing to go to own.
2. It is my duty to find out where I went wrong whether it is not building enough value,trust or understanding of my proposal.I did not drive the want,need,can use, can afford.
3 think over price? Chances are I am not the first to give a price hence they already have an idea of costs.
Impulse clients or stragey clients makes no difference.What is there to think over?See number 2.
I have no idea what that person sells that takes a client 4-5 times to decide to buy .I have no idea why it would take me that long with any decision. - by rich34232
Tom,
Please dont take everything personally that is posted here. And by no means is anywhere saying they are better than you. Everyone has been in your shoes and it took alot for us to get where we are at. I'm a perfect example. If I get a person face to face in a car sale situation, I have almost a 65% of getting them to agree on numbers and submitting that deal to finance. Of that 65% I get about 40% delivered and sold. My face to face closing ratio is great, BUT I do note the areas in which I need improvement. I have a 20% conversion ratio from phone call to appointment, and I have been listening to what these guys have been telling me. For this month I am at 35% closing ratio. Of the 20 phone ups I have had 7 show up. Of those 7 I have sold 5 units. Listen to what these guys are telling you and you will do better. Don't take everything as a direct insult because that's not why this forum is here. If someone suggests something, give it a try. It may work for you. Some stuff may not but don't use that. Example 2: I never try to qualify a customer. I find most customers already have an idea what they can afford, and for the most part they do. My job is to build value into the product and present it in such a way that it sounds like an outstanding deal. My managment team LOVES me for the simple fact I never argue with them at the desk. They put the numbers on the paper, and I present them and close the customer as close to the numbers as possible.
As for the 1-9 being a low ratio, the average sales ratio for closing is 25%. That takes into account the "Masters" of selling and the brand new guys. So if the average is 25% and your closing around 10%, then yes it's low. I cant give you advice to much for the cold calling of customers to increase that ratio because thats my weakspot, but if you ever need help with increasing your close ratio face to face give me a call. - by jrboyd
I am not sure what you are asking from the people in this thread. I thought you wanted to know what we thought about your statement.
I think the person who said that uses sympathy not empathy and will lose more sales then they receive.
1. What exactly needs to be thought out? Most clients who are not called on the phone radomly already know about the product and the price they are willing to spend. Most even know how much more they are willing to go to own.
2. It is my duty to find out where I went wrong whether it is not building enough value,trust or understanding of my proposal.I did not drive the want,need,can use, can afford.
3 think over price? Chances are I am not the first to give a price hence they already have an idea of costs.
Impulse clients or stragey clients makes no difference.What is there to think over?See number 2.
I have no idea what that person sells that takes a client 4-5 times to decide to buy .I have no idea why it would take me that long with any decision.
Well rich34232

That is the difference in selling a large advertising investment compared to a vacuum cleaner.

If I were selling a vacuum cleaner I would expect to get a sale on the first call but I sell a very intangible product. I am asking a client to invest a large sum of money for an extended period of time and I would be very foolish if I did not expect to give my client some time to look at the very complicated advertising proposal I have just presented to him. Now surely you can understand that.



MP - by MPrince
MPrince I did not intend to offend you,I merely stated I can not undertsand why it would take anyone 5 times to decide on doing business with anyone. ie the client.I understand cycles are different in peoples worlds. I also understand not everyones process is the same as I have friends in advertising radio,television and print. I hope that is understandable.
Now is the advertising in question or the ad itself.With the advertising I have done in the apst an agreement to do the ad was a rather quick process. Coming up the the produced ad and an agreement happened to be a longer process.
I did not imply you are not a top sales person in your profession. - by rich34232
Food for thought Mprince

"Think you can and you will, think you can't and you won't"

It's like sports. Have you ever heard of a football team go into a game thinking they will lose? Guess what happens if they think that.. They will lose. Try thinking that you will close the deal on the first visit and guess what, you will start closing them. When I have a couple coming in to buy a car, I don't think about oh I might sell them a car, I already assume the one car for him is done, and I already figuring out how to sale her a car to. About 1 in 20 people that come in wanting to buy one car for wife, end up driving out in car for her, and a truck for him. - by jrboyd
MPrince I did not intend to offend you,I merely stated I can not undertsand why it would take anyone 5 times to decide on doing business with anyone. ie the client.I understand cycles are different in peoples worlds. I also understand not everyones process is the same as I have friends in advertising radio,television and print. I hope that is understandable.
Now is the advertising in question or the ad itself.With the advertising I have done in the apst an agreement to do the ad was a rather quick process. Coming up the the produced ad and an agreement happened to be a longer process.
I did not imply you are not a top sales person in your profession.
I don't know... Gitoner, who advertises here or is endorsed here I think said that it takes like 5 or 6 tries for the average sale.... It was late at night I read that though.... Of course he or I with my cataracts could be just as wrong as anybody I suppose too. - by rattus58
Food for thought Mprince

"Think you can and you will, think you can't and you won't"

It's like sports. Have you ever heard of a football team go into a game thinking they will lose? Guess what happens if they think that.. They will lose. Try thinking that you will close the deal on the first visit and guess what, you will start closing them. When I have a couple coming in to buy a car, I don't think about oh I might sell them a car, I already assume the one car for him is done, and I already figuring out how to sale her a car to. About 1 in 20 people that come in wanting to buy one car for wife, end up driving out in car for her, and a truck for him.
Look jr I appreciate you trying to give me advice I know you mean well but you nor rich have a clue about the process that I am talking about. I have spent most of my life in this business, raised four children (alone) and put them through college, while I was in this business and I make a six figure income. I do that by knowing MY business. You see, " I thought I could and I did." Why don't we make a deal...I will not and tell you how to sell cars, or tell rich how to sell vacuum cleaners and you don't tell me how to sell a broadcast television advertising campaign.

MP - by MPrince
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