Home > Resistance > I want to think about it

I want to think about it

Imagine the situation, you’ve spent 45 - 75 minutes with a prospective customer, understanding them and their needs, demonstrating the product that suits them - they like it! You’ve explained your pricing and terms of payment and delivery. After asking a closing question the customer says ''I want to think about it'' so you explore and handle the concern and try to gain commitment now, but the customer is adamant that they want to ''sleep on it''. This customer is going to walk. The question is - what do you say now, just before they leave and when you follow them up a day or two later? - by marky
"I perfectly understand Mr. Customer. It's a very important decision. But before you go may I ask something sir? You do like the product right? It is what you were looking for? And have I done anything to offend you? Was it something I did? Ok so if its not the product and it's not me, then what is it you aren't sure about?" - by jrboyd
Trust and value not enough of it for the client. What exactly is there to think aout? It is either the proposal or the price.

Mr. Client do you have any concerns with my proposal? If no is it the price? Find out if there is any unanswwered concerns about the proposal asking questions to gain more knowledge

Ask if they have any doubts about your ability to perform your promises.The ability of your company to deliver on said promises. You are narrowong down the objection to price.

Once there ask if price is a concern with moving forward today.If it is ask why it is.Ask how much to muchj.When you ask a person what they were thinking to pay today they gve you a really low ball number. By asking how much to much a suggested price closer to yours will be relayed to you from the client.

Once you get to the real concern of price there are a thousdand ways to answer that concern depending on your clients emotion,education of the product,attitude etc. - by rich34232
These are valid points and I understand the underlying question, especially if your gut tells you the client is going to walk.

It's also important to give a customer time to think when making a big decision with a big price tag. I'll typically ask about their objections or what would get in the way of moving forward (I stay away from the "have I offended you", etc. because I don't want to be too pushy or seem too needy). If they still need time, I'm simply respectful and firm.

"I understand this is a big decision and you need time to think about it. May I ask what factors you're considering or what will go into your thought process moving forward? I want you to take as much time as you need because I want you to be happy with the decision. When do you think I should follow up? Can we put time on our calendars now since I know things come up?"

It's important to find the balance between firm and respectful. Pushing them into a decision they're not ready to make yet could backfire on you. Of course, losing the sale will have its consequences too!

Best,
Stephen - by sfrenkel
What if you don't close them and they do walk, what next? If I was spending $15,000 I may want to mull it over, equate it in my own mind, sleep on it. But as a sales person I wouldn't want to let the prospect walk and never talk to her again. So what is the best way to handle the departure and then the re-contact? - by marky
Imagine the situation, you’ve spent 45 - 75 minutes with a prospective customer, understanding them and their needs, demonstrating the product that suits them - they like it! You’ve explained your pricing and terms of payment and delivery. After asking a closing question the customer says ''I want to think about it'' so you explore and handle the concern and try to gain commitment now, but the customer is adamant that they want to ''sleep on it''. This customer is going to walk. The question is - what do you say now, just before they leave and when you follow them up a day or two later?
Here's what I teach in that situation (although I think it's important for all to understand that many customers like this can still be closed immediately):

"Great! That sounds like a good plan [that's called validating the prospect, and is very important and often overlooked but shouldn't be!]. What do you think you'll do?"

About 50% of the time, your prospect will bite on your question, and you'll end up having dialog about what's going on, often time resulting in being able to close the order on the spot. The other 50% of the time you end up having to give the prospect their "sleep on it" time. - by Skip Anderson
Marky,

That's why I get time on their calendar right then and there. Give them the time to think it over, but get one step closer by asking them for another commitment.

If you're reasonable and agree to give them time without seeming stressed about the close, I believe you exude confidence in yourself and your product, which never hurts.

Stephen - by sfrenkel
Here is why I disagree . They know they are going for a big ticket item. The client knows what they want and how much more they are willing to spend. I ask myself what exactly is there to think about. I then ask them what part that needs attention.
Sure there are going to be some that split and really think about it.Others are going to blaze a trail to the next dealer.Why not let that dealer be you.Each client is different, a solid answer cannot be given as to what I say.Skip has a rock solid question to ask the client. Mine is similar be more blunt in asking what do you have to think about?
Quite often we make this thing called sales a lot more difficult than it really is. We always think we must be clever in the way we ask our questions. Many times the proper question is the easy question. If we want to know what motivates our owners, ask them.Take the guess work out of it.
I always try to recommend to others never to sell the way they buy. I wil say look at what you do when you want to buy a car boat. You research. You have an idea of what you want. You know the dollars you are willing to spend.What is it that you have to think about. Could it be the trust? Probably most of the time it is the trust with the dealer and sales person.The product and dollars have already been decided before they enter your place of business in most cases - by rich34232
If they have to think about it then they aren't sure about something. It's either the product your company or you as a salesman. OR you skipped steps and didn't build enough value in the presentation. People who don't think one of those 3 is worth it are scared to tell you no. Instead they will usually say "Give me some time to think about it." Find out what they need to think about. Reduce their concerns to the ridiculus. Also get some sort of commitment from them before you even get to the close.

"So Mr. Customer, if I can show you how to fit our product into your monthly budget, is there any reason we can't do business today?"

Then when you show them how they can afford your product and they through that objection in you can always go back to that commitment. Put the commitment in writing and have them sign. (Car Sales Example)
"I, (Customers Name), will take delivery of this vehicle if payments do not exceed $540 a month, with $5,000 down and you get me $2,000 for my trade" x_______________ (signature)

That way when you show them payments of 530 a month with 2000 for trade and 5k down and they throw that objection at you you can say:

"Mr. Customer, did I do something to offend you? I was just wondering because I thought you had agreed that if I got you payments of 540/month w/ 5k down and 2000 for your trade, we had a deal. I've got you all that and now your telling me that you still need to think about it. I must have done something to upset you, because I have given you what you wanted and you still don't want to do business. I apologize for whatever I did sir, let me get another salesperson to assist you because I don't want you to miss out on such a good deal." - by jrboyd
Part of the problem with this approach is that it seems heavy handed to me. No matter how sincere you are, you're now telling the customer that the only way for them to tell you that you haven't offended them is to buy a car from you. This feels like manipulation to me.

The comments posted in this thread have not taken into account the other factors that a buyer SHOULD be considering (as I do when I buy a car), namely - the total cost to them over the life of the loan. You can bring monthly payments down to $1/month if you finance a car for 50 years (I'm making that figure up, by the way), but a smart buyer will be concerned about the total cost to them over the life of the loan.

Do your homework and do your best but, especially in the car industry, be careful about manipulating your customers (or doing anything that can be perceived as such) - buyers are wary!

In my first several car purchases, I left feeling like I missed something because I didn't take the time I needed. I now ALWAYS leave and come back. It has NOTHING to do with the salesperson, just personal preference and experience telling me to think about an important decision and consider everything for longer than the 30-60 minutes that I've been at the dealership. I return, but never if I'm being pressured (and I tell the dealer that!).

Stephen - by sfrenkel
sfrenkel I can appreciate what you said.I also understand how you can think this way. I can tell by ther way you answer many questions and concerns you put a lot of thought towards the answer and reasons. This also leads me to the conclusion you already know and understand the terms of the loan.I cannot imagine you not being prepared with information. Exactly what is the real reason you need to think more on the terms.

I am using the car analogy only due to it being used. I base my decision on many factors. I watched my father while he purchased cars for him and helping to purchase cars for his 7 children and in turn I have purchased many cars for my wife and I and our 3 children.We have an idea what is a fair price and the interest rate I want to pay and how much I am willing to overstep what I want to pay. I as a sales techncian also understand that this is not the first rodeo for most of my clients.


The I have to think about it is a smoke screen that needs to be addressed to find out exactly what there is to think about.


Facts that are known. They love the car,price seems fair,can drive off with the car,insurance is available.Unknowns. trust of the sales person and company.
I do agree putting the client in a defensive position telling the client that you have done what they asked and still they have put the decision off. Let me know your reason for not doing your part of our bargin, is a horrible idea.One that will lose more sales then gain.Instead of being clever simply ask Mr. Client would you mind telling me what it is that needs to be thought over? Using the door knob close. Mr. Client would you tell me the real reason you are not going forward today with my proposal. - by rich34232
Stephen brings up a good point. This is why it's important to NOT skip any steps in the sales process. If I was to skip the interview and build rapport, I may try to use the close I stated above, and would probably lose the customer. You must know your customer. For a customer like Stephen I would realize that he isn't completely ready to buy and therefor would present it differently

"Now Stephen, I know you are not 100% ready to purchase today. I do realize it is the second biggest decision you have to make in your life time, and by all means I don't like to pressure someone into a purchase as big as this. Just curious though, is there a "Magic" number that you had in mind, that if we were able to get to you would jump on the deal right now? (Prepare for a ridiculus offer. I get Free as a response alot of times). <Laugh> Yeah I know I would jump at that deal to! But in all seriousness, I'm sure you had a specific number in mind when you came in right? And that number is? So if I can get you close to the number that you already had in mind, what else would keep you from taking ownership today?"

This are all soft commitments, and would be done before I present numbers. If still can't get customer to commit then I would go to..
"Well Stephen I perfectly understand your position. Before I sold cars I use to buy them and I was always nervous to. I'd hate to show you numbers now, because they wouldn't be true numbers. When you are ready to buy let me know so I can get you the best deal possible. I've never lost a customer over price, and I promise when you are ready to buy that you will leave here EXTREMELY happy." - by jrboyd
"Think it over" means one of three things in almost all cases.

They are:
  • It is a convenient way to stall and not reveal the REAL objection or concern which is often the money.
  • It is a hardwired part of some people's buying process that requires hesitating before making a final decision, often expressed as "sleeping on it". Some couples actually have a pact to do this in their larger purchases.
  • It is a result of lack full confidence which is more a fear of making a bad decision rather than a goal to make a good decision. Most "shoppers" shop out of such a fear.
In order to effectively move forward with any of those three, you have to be able to discern which category the prospect falls into. "Think it over.." should not come as a surprise to an experienced salesperson. Trial closes, and minor agreements during the sales process will help determine where the prospect's mind is at. - by Ace Coldiron
Well put, Ace.

It's important to consider all of those as possibilities (and to ask good questions that will hopefully give you a better sense of the situation at hand), rather than make assumptions that you know where the buyer is coming from.

There's a different, appropriate and effective response for each of these circumstances.

Stephen - by sfrenkel
Most of my sales involve us asking our clients to "think it over". We almost NEVER try to sell on the first meeting, but to give them information, try to motivate if necessary,and by this it is meant to get them thinking where our products would help them if they suffered some catastrophe in their lives, like a cut finger, for example.... :)

When we see them for a final meeting, it is with the understanding that we are meeting to move forward, go ahead with, to wrap up their choice for enrollment, enroll in your coverage choice, etc.

There are times when wanting them to "think it over" is not a bad thing, maybe not when buying a car, but in the financial products arena we're quite happy to design something for them in the work place and have them take it home to get approval from the spouse.

So far, our cancellation rate over thousands of policies is less than 50 in almost 8 years of doing this, and once issued, our cancellation rate is probably less than 20.

There are times when you may also want to sit down with both spouses to come to agreement.

Aloha.... :cool: - by rattus58
"Think it over" means one of three things in almost all cases.

They are:
  • It is a convenient way to stall and not reveal the REAL objection or concern which is often the money.
  • It is a hardwired part of some people's buying process that requires hesitating before making a final decision, often expressed as "sleeping on it". Some couples actually have a pact to do this in their larger purchases.
  • It is a result of lack full confidence which is more a fear of making a bad decision rather than a goal to make a good decision. Most "shoppers" shop out of such a fear.
In order to effectively move forward with any of those three, you have to be able to discern which category the prospect falls into. "Think it over.." should not come as a surprise to an experienced salesperson. Trial closes, and minor agreements during the sales process will help determine where the prospect's mind is at.
thmbp2;

After 4 years in timeshare which is 'Decision on the Day', once you build trust, its time to break the pact.

Couples, business people, everybody makes pacts.........

DOD's happen because you didn't break the pact, they dont trust you or your product. - by PiJiL

DOD's happen because you didn't break the pact, they dont trust you or your product.
I'm not sure I understand your last sentence.

The category in which I referred to a "pact" has been something I have dealt with many times--almost always successfully. I've said it before on this forum. You take the process-driven into tasks, and take the task-driven into a process. A Closing Paradox. - by Ace Coldiron
I'm not sure I understand your last sentence.

The category in which I referred to a "pact" has been something I have dealt with many times--almost always successfully. I've said it before on this forum. You take the process-driven into tasks, and take the task-driven into a process. A Closing Paradox.

You've said it before on this forum...

Right but who's heard it. Like I know intuitively what you mean by a pact... or even the process driven into task and take the task-driven into a process....

Why don't you explain that for me..... - by rattus58
Imagine the situation, you’ve spent 45 - 75 minutes with a prospective customer, understanding them and their needs, demonstrating the product that suits them - they like it! You’ve explained your pricing and terms of payment and delivery. After asking a closing question the customer says ''I want to think about it'' so you explore and handle the concern and try to gain commitment now, but the customer is adamant that they want to ''sleep on it''. This customer is going to walk. The question is - what do you say now, just before they leave and when you follow them up a day or two later?
The problem here is if read this correctly, only one closing effort was made. The idea here is close often and close early and get the no's out of the way early in the game. A well structured approach is necessary.

Trial close, trial close, close, close, close. Certainly your chances of closing this client go down exponentially if they walk out he door... period. It is also very important to realize a qualified client can't say "no" more than 5 times. Pull out your play book of closes..........Do you know how many times some of my favorite customers said the same thing, after they understood the benefits of my product, they didn't feel that way anymore.

Other salesman/sales ladies I have seen say, do you know if I had a dollar for every time I heard that I would be a millionaire & LOL. I generally don't go that route because if they were truly a millionaire they wouldn't be on the sales floor.

j.p.o - by DIAMONDSTAR
thmbp2;

After 4 years in timeshare which is 'Decision on the Day', once you build trust, its time to break the pact.

Couples, business people, everybody makes pacts.........

DOD's happen because you didn't break the pact, they dont trust you or your product.
Great point, and that is speaking as one former time share junkie to another.

Your not gonna let sleeping on it sway you from vacationing in Paradise are you "Sharon". Shift fire & take out the other party - by DIAMONDSTAR
My street corner opinion.

I am selling plumbing services that people must have, but if I do not close a sale on the first visit very few people will call me back. I go for the entire Enchilada or nothing when I sell. I never quote to do an entire job and offer less if they will not close.

When a customer tells me he wants to think about the job I absolutely believe him, so I give him another 10 minutes to think while I start my entire sales presentation from the beginning just like I never said one word. This serves many purposes as it clears up things the customer did not understand the first time and it gives him time to think. Many customers want to hear the entire presentation a 2nd time.

When a customer still tells me he does not want to buy, I tell him this:

"There are three things that are important for this job. First, and most important is the work that is done. It doesn't matter what you pay for the job. If the work is not done right, you wasted your money. You can see by the pictures, specification sheets, and contract, you are going to get the best job. I don't know one plumber that does work this good, so you know you are getting the best job!."

"The second most important thing, is the price. We charge every customer the same price, because we are the only plumber, I know, who has our prices printed in our price book, on our specification sheets, and on our web site, for the whole world to see. Our book price, that is low, was $12,800, and I even gave you $1100 off that price. So, you know you are getting the best price."

"The third most important thing, is who is going to do the work. We have been in business, for almost 40 years, in the same location, the same owner, and we even give you an Original Owner Lifetime Guarantee. So, you know you have the best company." - by pcplumber
My street corner opinion.
Excellent, pcplumber. That's good selling! Powerful stuff. - by Ace Coldiron
Excellent, pcplumber. That's good selling! Powerful stuff.
Thank you very much. - by pcplumber
Excellent, pcplumber. That's good selling! Powerful stuff.

I agree, this is a rock solid strategy

He has positioned his company…. 40 years in the business

He has positioned his service…..life time warranty

He has built value with the best service at the best price with the best quality of work

After received his anticipated objection, gave them a breather, went back to show & tell, and closed them again.


j.p.o - by DIAMONDSTAR
I think I have permissions to post the link to this manual. I hope. (Link moved to signature by Moderator)

This is a manual I wrote to help plumbers close sales. These methods are specific for contractors and these are the exact methods we use. This manual is absolutely not for sale. Although, any person who would like to edit, use, or modify any portions is more than welcome.

Don't beat me too much if you read it. - by pcplumber
pcplumber,

It sounds like you've got a great process that works for you. Your pitch sounds strong and well supported by various figures that are indeed important to your customers.

At the same time, I caution the readers of this thread (especially those in B2B sales rather than B2C) against the idea of "giving him another 10 minutes to think while I start my entire sales presentation from the beginning just like I never said one word."

As a general rule, repeating the same process expecting a different result is the definition of insanity (this is where a lot of sales people go wrong in my opinion). When my clients have concerns or objections, it's more important for me to ask questions and understand what's on their mind. I can then respond to those issues they raise one at a time. Repeating my presentation "as if I never said a word" would often prove a waste of everyone's time and would probably leave them wondering why I would dive back in from the beginning if it didn't work the first time.

Of course, some people want to hear it again and for those, I say go for it.

Just my $.02

Stephen - by sfrenkel
pcplumber,

It sounds like you've got a great process that works for you. Your pitch sounds strong and well supported by various figures that are indeed important to your customers.

At the same time, I caution the readers of this thread (especially those in B2B sales rather than B2C) against the idea of "giving him another 10 minutes to think while I start my entire sales presentation from the beginning just like I never said one word."

As a general rule, repeating the same process expecting a different result is the definition of insanity (this is where a lot of sales people go wrong in my opinion). When my clients have concerns or objections, it's more important for me to ask questions and understand what's on their mind. I can then respond to those issues they raise one at a time. Repeating my presentation "as if I never said a word" would often prove a waste of everyone's time and would probably leave them wondering why I would dive back in from the beginning if it didn't work the first time.

Of course, some people want to hear it again and for those, I say go for it.

Just my $.02

Stephen
I brought up the question before about why sales people ask so many questions and I can see where some questions are necessary, but I also hate it when a sales asks me questions, or probe me. For my type of sales, I see six major problems with asking questions:

1) The customer does not know the answer so he gives you a wrong answer.

2) The customer is purposely give you the wrong answer because he thinks he knows where you are going with the question.

3) Questions create arguments

4) Questions can waste valuable time that can be use more wisely.

5) Questions and answers add fuel to the confusion.

6) Questions and answers break my control over the customer and the sale turns into a question and answer battle. Everyone forgets where they left off and it is difficult to get on track.

As for starting my sales from the beginning, this has worked for my customers who are homeowners. I suppose you would have to see the mannerism in which it is done, but for some strange reason it seems to work almost every time. I will agree with you when talking about business customers as this may actually insult or offend a business customer, as he may say, "what do you think, I am stupid. I heard you the first time?"

Don't take me the wrong way. I am a little rough around the edges and I came to this forum to learn. I am weighing everything that you say.

Thank you for your advice. - by pcplumber
For my type of sales, I see six major problems with asking questions:

1) The customer does not know the answer so he gives you a wrong answer.
What type of questions are you asking? If the customer doesn't know the answer to the question, then chances are your asking the wrong questions. "What is it your looking for in this particular product/service?" I don't see how the customer can answer that wrong, and its hard for the sales person to guess the customer's intentions.

2) The customer is purposely give you the wrong answer because he thinks he knows where you are going with the question.
If the customer is answering you untruthfully because he thinks you are trying to put a spin on the situation, then you haven't had enough rapport built with them. By the time you are asking questions this specific to the sale, then they should have atleast some trust in you. I find using "May I make a suggestion," while steering my customers works very well.

3) Questions create arguments
But not asking questions, and not fact finding will have you presenting the wrong ideas on topics that the customer.

4) Questions can waste valuable time that can be use more wisely.
Finding out your customer's true wants and needs is never a waste of time. Put the customer's agenda first not your own

5) Questions and answers add fuel to the confusion.
Again, how are you asking the questions? Questions are designed to clarify not confuse.

6) Questions and answers break my control over the customer and the sale turns into a question and answer battle. Everyone forgets where they left off and it is difficult to get on track.
He who asks questions controls the conversation.
I would really like to see what questions you ask and how your asking them. Maybe by tweaking a few words we can help you out and avoid the above. - by jrboyd
What type of questions are you asking? If the customer doesn't know the answer to the question, then chances are your asking the wrong questions. "What is it your looking for in this particular product/service?" I don't see how the customer can answer that wrong, and its hard for the sales person to guess the customer's intentions.



If the customer is answering you untruthfully because he thinks you are trying to put a spin on the situation, then you haven't had enough rapport built with them. By the time you are asking questions this specific to the sale, then they should have atleast some trust in you. I find using "May I make a suggestion," while steering my customers works very well.



But not asking questions, and not fact finding will have you presenting the wrong ideas on topics that the customer.


Finding out your customer's true wants and needs is never a waste of time. Put the customer's agenda first not your own


Again, how are you asking the questions? Questions are designed to clarify not confuse.





I would really like to see what questions you ask and how your asking them. Maybe by tweaking a few words we can help you out and avoid the above.
I appreciate your offer, but I can't think of any questions I ask my customers with the exception of the basics like their name, etc. I will ask some questions when the occasion arises, like how old are you and then I'll them them they look really younger. Yes, I lie a little! I'll ask a few questions about their work or family. But, I have never used questions for the purpose of steering a person to make a favorable decision. Maybe, you can think of some questions I could ask. - by pcplumber
I don't know if this signature is going to work, so this is a test and hopefully a link to a manual I wrote specifically for my business. This manual includes philosophies and sales methods I live by. It is a little rough so please be nice, but we close a very high percent of leads. - by pcplumber
I understand Leonards message and system.What works for him is what works in his region.He knows the climate of his clients.He has 40 years experience with a system that works well with the people.Hard line, hard stance, and hard results.Can never argue with success.
I understand the differing views.Quite a lot goes against conventional sales. However thinking outside the proverbial box a lot of the ideas and principles of this system makes sense. - by rich34232
I appreciate your offer, but I can't think of any questions I ask my customers with the exception of the basics like their name, etc. I will ask some questions when the occasion arises, like how old are you and then I'll them them they look really younger. Yes, I lie a little! I'll ask a few questions about their work or family. But, I have never used questions for the purpose of steering a person to make a favorable decision. Maybe, you can think of some questions I could ask.
When would you like the work completed?
You can use it three ways
Use an assumptive close & pass them the work order
Probing question; find out what is important to them
Bridge; If I can guarantee that do we have a deal?

On the chit chat side of the house, (Which I try to avoid) I may ask if they have any hobbies
I can generally find common grounds with them irregardless of whatever hobby they may have


j.p.o - by DIAMONDSTAR
Luckly PC is in a position, where there is a definate NEED for his services. How often have you called a plumber just because you were curious? Most people that call him have a definite need, ie basement underwater. So his initial sell is pretty easy to close, now all we have to do is get the right questions asked to see if we can upsell his services! :) - by jrboyd
Certainly, we all need good plumbing services & plumbing products.

Adding on will not only increase service, or labor, but increase the number of items sold

Ie, the customer might already be sold on the vanity faucet set, the next step would be to suggest the matching or complimentary shower set which the client maybe hasn’t considered. It might be a little bit more but it sure completes the bathroom. Heck Mr. Client should be saying to himself/herself, Our friendly plumber is going to be here anyway, we are actually saving ourselves on his return trip.

Up selling brand is also important. We can sell them cheap stuff from our plumber supply discount warehouse & it’s cheap all right, but our friendly plumber will be back to service it sooner or later. Up selling ie Moen, costs a little more, but we have far less worries.

Generally speaking from the retail side of the house, we are looking at 100% markup. Yeah, The Moen may costs us a little more, but, now our margin has also increased proportionately - by DIAMONDSTAR
I'm not sure I understand your last sentence.
DOD = Decision on the Day

If you do not qualify the intention of the meeting, there will not be a satisfactory outcome..............thmbp2; - by PiJiL
I rarely get a "I want to think it over", and when I do, sometimes I'm stuck for an answer and have more than once blurted out "Why?" It's the recovery from the "Why" that I get into the most trouble too....

I'm really not a very subtle person... and my wife tells me that my subtleties are more like hammers.. but here is what has happened to me with Why....

Client a) Because I want to talk it over with my wife and get her opinion!

Salesperson... Rat's... you mean we should have been discussing this with her all along? Damn... I'm sorry Rod... I wasn't thinking, I'm hoping I didn't waste your time... again... I shoulda qualified this a little better huh...? Shall I come over this evening to go over this with the two of you like I should have from the beginning... sheeeesh

Do you think she'll find your loss of income needs as important as you do? What would she say about the alternatives we've discussed? How will the daily expendenditure of $2.40 sound to her in order to provide you with a $1,500 income?

Client B) Because I don't know if I need it. I've got some other stuff that might take care of this already with State Farm...

Salesperson.... Ok... that would be the best outcome for you. Can I check back with you on Thursday to see what you do indeed have with State Farm and if you don't have what you think you might have, should I have an application prepared for us to move forward?

Client C) Because I've got a friend in the business who I want to check with as well.

Salesperson... The last time you and he reviewed your Disability Income Portfolio what steps did you take to protect your paycheck? I appreciate that you want a second opinion, so did I, that's why you have two different proposals in your hand, but let me ask you one last question... If it's the money, and it probably means skipping one or two movies this month, since you've nothing now, would you prefer to compromise and just cover the catastrophic for now so you don't lose your house and do a 90 day wait for benefits as a sensible alternative. That way we go from never to 90 days, wouldn't that make sense?

These are made up, obviously... I'm just not that smooth on my feet, but these do represent where I've recovered from and the approach I've attempted to take to overcome the "Let me think it over...

Challenging... but I'd just as soon not have them.. :)

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
I rarely get a "I want to think it over", and when I do, sometimes I'm stuck for an answer and have more than once blurted out "Why?" It's the recovery from the "Why" that I get into the most trouble too....

I'm really not a very subtle person... and my wife tells me that my subtleties are more like hammers.. but here is what has happened to me with Why....

Client a) Because I want to talk it over with my wife and get her opinion!

Salesperson... Rat's... you mean we should have been discussing this with her all along? Damn... I'm sorry Rod... I wasn't thinking, I'm hoping I didn't waste your time... again... I shoulda qualified this a little better huh...? Shall I come over this evening to go over this with the two of you like I should have from the beginning... sheeeesh

Do you think she'll find your loss of income needs as important as you do? What would she say about the alternatives we've discussed? How will the daily expendenditure of $2.40 sound to her in order to provide you with a $1,500 income?

Client B) Because I don't know if I need it. I've got some other stuff that might take care of this already with State Farm...

Salesperson.... Ok... that would be the best outcome for you. Can I check back with you on Thursday to see what you do indeed have with State Farm and if you don't have what you think you might have, should I have an application prepared for us to move forward?

Client C) Because I've got a friend in the business who I want to check with as well.

Salesperson... The last time you and he reviewed your Disability Income Portfolio what steps did you take to protect your paycheck? I appreciate that you want a second opinion, so did I, that's why you have two different proposals in your hand, but let me ask you one last question... If it's the money, and it probably means skipping one or two movies this month, since you've nothing now, would you prefer to compromise and just cover the catastrophic for now so you don't lose your house and do a 90 day wait for benefits as a sensible alternative. That way we go from never to 90 days, wouldn't that make sense?

These are made up, obviously... I'm just not that smooth on my feet, but these do represent where I've recovered from and the approach I've attempted to take to overcome the "Let me think it over...

Challenging... but I'd just as soon not have them.. :)

Aloha... Tom :cool:

Finding out earlier in the game, ie before you start sizzling your presentation and working up a sweat. You may want to ask your client, “who in addition to yourself will be making the final decision”. From there, from there give them a positive outlook towards your service, & ask for another appointment. This will allow them to both ask pertinent questions.
This time management approach not only start’s the qualification process, but conserves time which is very important. Takes just as much time to close a qualified prospect as it does to try to close an unqualified prospect.
Reflexive closing strategies are also important. Objections are really requests for more information. Practice, rehearse & practice some more.

j.p.o - by DIAMONDSTAR
Plumbing is not sales, people have water in a basement and they call you there to fix it. A new lavatory facet turns into a new tub and shower faucet. The old thought patterns of a plumber being a plumber are dying thoughts and impression. Our sales is like anyone other professionals sales. We must drive the need, want, can use, and afford.
We want to fix all the problems in a home. That new lavatory faucet not only deserves a new cabinet but demands a new tub with faucet and while you’re there a new water closet. By the way other two bathrooms are the same age we should spend time discussing those products.
A car keeps breaking down on a mother wife daughter they need a new car. This matches quite well with a flooding basement. There is a need and they come to you. There is a need but do they need to purchase from me? This holds true to any other product or piece of equipment on the planet.
I am also in plumbing and I understand Leonard’s system and I like this system as it attacks the whole system not just that small minded job of repairing and putting a band aid to gain more time for the client. We must attempt to change the mind set of all people who believe a plumber is just a lowly plumber not capable to think outside of the box that payday is Friday and the bar is open until 230 am. We are a fun bunch and sometimes a little crazy. However we do look at ourselves as true professionals.
As examples. I walk into a clients home who has a faucet that is not working and I see a cane or walker. Do you fix the faucet or do you talk about ada water closets to make their life easier? Ada stands for Americans Disability Act. This is a higher than normal water closet. A water closet is a toilet. A person with arthritis, isn’t it my duty to talk to them about loop handle faucet that can make their life easier to open and close the faucet when their hands are hurting? I see an acid base drain cleaner in a cabinet, my duty to bring up the organic drain cleaner that is safe to have with small children?
A drain line that has had numerous repairs isn’t it better to replace that system instead of repairing and repairing and throwing money away? A busted pipe or pin hole leak in a water line. Repair that or replace that system as one pin hole translates into two and so on. Back to ada , why not install grab bars for stability in the showers or tubs. See it is not fix this and be back another day to make another repair.
Leonard’s system is to place a sense of urgency into the clients mind to take care of it now and quick wasting time and money on simple silly repairs. Repeating the presentation visualizes to the client the need to take care of the total issue now. The client has used different companies and not one has made a suggestion so bold however they have been stealing the client’s money for a very long time using the band aid approach. Once the client has this knowledge and realizes the senseless money being spent on repairs the client signs. Having to think on making the right decision needs no more thought, make this a thing of the past and quit wasting your time. I also understand that the majority of the homes he is talking about are older homes. Where spending the least amount of money doing band aid repairs has damaged the home let us help you with the upkeep of your home.
We are a similar company with slight differences. Our approach is different; we build relationships with our clients. We have no basements. I have been in one home with a basement in 16 years. However I am there to help guide the client towards decisions that make their life easier. I may be there to repair a broken faucet but I must see and hear what the client is actually saying to me. If they show me their bathroom I better know why they are showing me that bathroom. I must ask questions. I have to be insightful with my comments to allow the client to tell me what they want their fixtures and system to do better for them. Plumbing is not just plumbing anymore. There is a sales process and presentation. There is question and answer time. There are suggestions of additional sales that enhance the life of the client. Then I must drive the want, need, can use and can afford.
These are driven like anyone else’s sales process using empathy, facts, storytelling, benefits, and features. I must be creative and imaginative to make this an enjoyable process for my client. Taking a simple one hundred dollar fix and turning it into a twelve thousand dollar remodel. Most of the time completing the ownership exchange in one trip. It is not as easy as one might think sitting back in a suit engineering a Xerox deal behind a desk and meeting with a gate keeper to allow entry to speak to a decision maker. I have a million other plumbers who have no idea what the cost to do business is let alone charging a fair rate to make a great living in an industry that believes we are just a plumber.
Doctors ,lawyers, ceo’s of large companies, sports legends, sports analysts, famous book writers, vice presidents, models ,actors, and ordinary average Joes. Most of the sales professionals I have met deal with one type client. Normally they are not the owner but an extension of the owner. I am not putting any other professional down I am trying to make you realize this is not the easiest thing to do. We are also very professional in what we do; we have a process that delivers and works and is as viable as any other process. Open minds take a peek into the unknown and try to understand a little different unorthodox system that does work.
.
- by rich34232
, “who in addition to yourself will be making the final decision”. j.p.o
We try to not get into one on one at the home very often because mostly we're a worksite company, but we do get into these situations frequently enough... :)

Aloha... :cool: - by rattus58
i think the sales rep. can do the following
1-loud his voice in respect way and asking for the reason
2-re -evaluate his sales operation and putting hisself instead of the customers (why i need to think)(answer 1 i don't believe what the rep. say and i want to check,2- i'm not the desicion maker and i'm afraid to say,3-i don't need the product and i'll not tell the rep.)so your answer must be
i'm so happy that u'll think about my qutation but let to repeat some point maybe i've forgetten something - by powermant2
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